Self-Reported Lifestyle Health Behaviors, Menstrual Health, Perceived Stress and General Health Status: Women with FMS and Healthy Controls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159424
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Reported Lifestyle Health Behaviors, Menstrual Health, Perceived Stress and General Health Status: Women with FMS and Healthy Controls
Abstract:
Self-Reported Lifestyle Health Behaviors, Menstrual Health, Perceived Stress and General Health Status: Women with FMS and Healthy Controls
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Wilbur, JoEllen
Contact Address:PMA , USA
Co-Authors:Joan Shaver; Mary Buntin; Joseph Kogan; Michelle Choi
The purpose of this study is to compare women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) to controls (without FMS) on: self-reported lifestyle health behaviors (eating, alcohol, smoking, physical activity, sleep, sexuality), menstrual health (menstrual status, premenstrual syndrome, infertility), perceived stress and general health status. This descriptive study employed a telephone survey. Eligibility for FMS women included diagnosed by a health care provider and symptoms during the last six months. Exclusion criteria for FMS and control women included: rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, chronic thyroid condition and mental illness. A volunteer sample of 373 women (303 FMS, 69 without) was recruited through newspaper notices, flyers, cable TV, support group newsletters and the internet. The women ranged in age from 26 to 76 years (mean=47.7). There was no significant difference in age between the two groups. The majority of women were Caucasian (87%), married (60%), and had more than a high school education (85%). They represented 42 states and Canada. Eating, smoking, and alcohol were measured with questions from the Behavioral Risk Surveillance Survey. The Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to identify physical activity. Sleep and sexuality measures were derived for this study. Menstrual questions came from the Massachusetts Women's Health and the Washington Women's Health studies. Perceived stress and general health status were from the SF-12. Results indicated that women with FMS as compared to women without differed mainly in terms of physical activity (number blocks walked 7.8 vs. 13.3), stress (21.7% vs. 1.5% felt blue) and perhaps sleep and sexuality but little in terms of eating or smoking behaviors. Results suggest that women with FMS might be more prone than healthy women to the consequences of inactivity, have poor sleep and perceived stress. Interventions to improve activity levels and fitness might moderate the stress and sleep problems and improve health perceptions. AN: MN030325
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Reported Lifestyle Health Behaviors, Menstrual Health, Perceived Stress and General Health Status: Women with FMS and Healthy Controlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159424-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Reported Lifestyle Health Behaviors, Menstrual Health, Perceived Stress and General Health Status: Women with FMS and Healthy Controls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilbur, JoEllen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PMA , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan Shaver; Mary Buntin; Joseph Kogan; Michelle Choi </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study is to compare women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) to controls (without FMS) on: self-reported lifestyle health behaviors (eating, alcohol, smoking, physical activity, sleep, sexuality), menstrual health (menstrual status, premenstrual syndrome, infertility), perceived stress and general health status. This descriptive study employed a telephone survey. Eligibility for FMS women included diagnosed by a health care provider and symptoms during the last six months. Exclusion criteria for FMS and control women included: rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, chronic thyroid condition and mental illness. A volunteer sample of 373 women (303 FMS, 69 without) was recruited through newspaper notices, flyers, cable TV, support group newsletters and the internet. The women ranged in age from 26 to 76 years (mean=47.7). There was no significant difference in age between the two groups. The majority of women were Caucasian (87%), married (60%), and had more than a high school education (85%). They represented 42 states and Canada. Eating, smoking, and alcohol were measured with questions from the Behavioral Risk Surveillance Survey. The Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to identify physical activity. Sleep and sexuality measures were derived for this study. Menstrual questions came from the Massachusetts Women's Health and the Washington Women's Health studies. Perceived stress and general health status were from the SF-12. Results indicated that women with FMS as compared to women without differed mainly in terms of physical activity (number blocks walked 7.8 vs. 13.3), stress (21.7% vs. 1.5% felt blue) and perhaps sleep and sexuality but little in terms of eating or smoking behaviors. Results suggest that women with FMS might be more prone than healthy women to the consequences of inactivity, have poor sleep and perceived stress. Interventions to improve activity levels and fitness might moderate the stress and sleep problems and improve health perceptions. AN: MN030325 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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