Beliefs and Attitudes of a Northern Minnesota American Indian Tribe Towards Organ Donation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159425
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beliefs and Attitudes of a Northern Minnesota American Indian Tribe Towards Organ Donation
Abstract:
Beliefs and Attitudes of a Northern Minnesota American Indian Tribe Towards Organ Donation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Wilkie, Misty
Contact Address:1107 14th Avenue South, Apt. #1, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA
The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing American Indians' decision to donate or not donate their organs. Minorities make up almost half of the national transplant waiting list. However, the majority of organ donors are Caucasian and are not a tissue match with minority populations. There exists an overwhelming need for organs, from cadavers as well as living donors. Many people die while waiting on the transplant waiting list to get a life saving organ. Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care Theory (2002) was most appropriate for this study since is focused on American Indians' beliefs and attitudes towards organ donation. Leininger states, "the theory is known for its broad, holistic yet culture-specific focus to discover meaningful care to diverse cultures" (2002, p. 190). The theory, in the past, has provided new teaching strategies for many different cultures. After IRB and tribal council approval, the identified population consisted of 397 adult members of a Band of Chippewa Indians in the United States living on a reservation. After a pilot test and expert critique was completed, a researcher designed survey was sent to these members. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the returned surveys. This is in process. Anticipated findings are; 1) the more culturally traditional the person is the less willing he/she is to donate organs, and 2) the participant would be more willing to donate while alive vs. after death. An increase in knowledge and awareness of organ donation is needed in American Indians to reduce the number of deaths of people on the transplant list. The information gained from this research will be utilized to develop a culture specific education model to increase the awareness of need for and desire to donate organs among American Indian people. AN MN030007
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeliefs and Attitudes of a Northern Minnesota American Indian Tribe Towards Organ Donationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159425-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Beliefs and Attitudes of a Northern Minnesota American Indian Tribe Towards Organ Donation </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilkie, Misty</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1107 14th Avenue South, Apt. #1, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing American Indians' decision to donate or not donate their organs. Minorities make up almost half of the national transplant waiting list. However, the majority of organ donors are Caucasian and are not a tissue match with minority populations. There exists an overwhelming need for organs, from cadavers as well as living donors. Many people die while waiting on the transplant waiting list to get a life saving organ. Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care Theory (2002) was most appropriate for this study since is focused on American Indians' beliefs and attitudes towards organ donation. Leininger states, &quot;the theory is known for its broad, holistic yet culture-specific focus to discover meaningful care to diverse cultures&quot; (2002, p. 190). The theory, in the past, has provided new teaching strategies for many different cultures. After IRB and tribal council approval, the identified population consisted of 397 adult members of a Band of Chippewa Indians in the United States living on a reservation. After a pilot test and expert critique was completed, a researcher designed survey was sent to these members. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the returned surveys. This is in process. Anticipated findings are; 1) the more culturally traditional the person is the less willing he/she is to donate organs, and 2) the participant would be more willing to donate while alive vs. after death. An increase in knowledge and awareness of organ donation is needed in American Indians to reduce the number of deaths of people on the transplant list. The information gained from this research will be utilized to develop a culture specific education model to increase the awareness of need for and desire to donate organs among American Indian people. AN MN030007</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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