2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159427
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Needs and Preferences in Patient Decision Making about Depression Treatment
Abstract:
Needs and Preferences in Patient Decision Making about Depression Treatment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Wills , Celia
Contact Address:CON, G38 North Hubbard Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48825, USA
As part of an ongoing study to develop a patient-centered decision support intervention (DSI) for depression treatment, decision making support needs and preferences for managing depression symptoms were assessed for a diverse sample of depressed primary care patients (N=106) enrolled in a large Midwestern HMO. Telephone survey and semi-structured interviews were used to gather data. Standardized measures included the PRIME-MD, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD), and Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS). A semi-structured interview based in part on concepts in the Ottawa Decision Support Framework (O’Connor et al., 1998) was used to explore patient perceptions of decision making about depression treatment. 53% met PRIME-MD criteria for major depression and 83.3% had CESD scores > 16 (M=25.8; SD=9.4), indicating clinically significant depression. 43.4% were currently making a decision about depression treatment. The average DCS score was 29 (SD=10.39), and multiple sources of decisional conflict were endorsed, including lack of: information about options (43.5%), clarity on personal values (39.1%), support from others (50%), motivation/readiness to make a decision (58.7%), and decision making skill/ability (23.9%). 84% preferred options other than antidepressant medication as a first choice for managing their depression symptoms. Patients reported a variety of non-medical approaches for managing depression, and preferred written information sources regarding depression management, especially sources viewed as more "private:" booklets/pamphlets (86.4%), videos (71.8%), books/magazines (80.6%), internet (77.7%). Patients reported a variety of needs for decision support as well as an interest in non-medical approaches for managing depression. These needs and preferences should be incorporated in the design of DSIs for this population. AN: MN030230
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeeds and Preferences in Patient Decision Making about Depression Treatmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159427-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Needs and Preferences in Patient Decision Making about Depression Treatment </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wills , Celia</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, G38 North Hubbard Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48825, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As part of an ongoing study to develop a patient-centered decision support intervention (DSI) for depression treatment, decision making support needs and preferences for managing depression symptoms were assessed for a diverse sample of depressed primary care patients (N=106) enrolled in a large Midwestern HMO. Telephone survey and semi-structured interviews were used to gather data. Standardized measures included the PRIME-MD, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD), and Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS). A semi-structured interview based in part on concepts in the Ottawa Decision Support Framework (O&rsquo;Connor et al., 1998) was used to explore patient perceptions of decision making about depression treatment. 53% met PRIME-MD criteria for major depression and 83.3% had CESD scores &gt; 16 (M=25.8; SD=9.4), indicating clinically significant depression. 43.4% were currently making a decision about depression treatment. The average DCS score was 29 (SD=10.39), and multiple sources of decisional conflict were endorsed, including lack of: information about options (43.5%), clarity on personal values (39.1%), support from others (50%), motivation/readiness to make a decision (58.7%), and decision making skill/ability (23.9%). 84% preferred options other than antidepressant medication as a first choice for managing their depression symptoms. Patients reported a variety of non-medical approaches for managing depression, and preferred written information sources regarding depression management, especially sources viewed as more &quot;private:&quot; booklets/pamphlets (86.4%), videos (71.8%), books/magazines (80.6%), internet (77.7%). Patients reported a variety of needs for decision support as well as an interest in non-medical approaches for managing depression. These needs and preferences should be incorporated in the design of DSIs for this population. AN: MN030230 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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