2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159428
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Mobilization in the Adult Intensive Care Unit: A Preliminary Report
Abstract:
Measuring Mobilization in the Adult Intensive Care Unit: A Preliminary Report
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Winkelman, Chris
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave , Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Yea-Jyh Kathy Chen; Patricia Higgins
There are no established tools which measure mobilization or therapeutic activity in the critically ill population. Mobilization is used to prevent complications and preserve function during illness. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of actigraphy as a measure of mobilization in the intensive care unit (ICU). Mobilization is defined as therapeutic stretching of muscles, range of joint motion, and weight-bearing activity. Mobilization includes range of motion (ROM) exercise, turning in bed, dangling, chair sitting, and ambulation. This is a pilot study to explore the use of actigraphy to measure mobilization by comparing actigraphy to direct observation. Actigraphy uses a monitor containing an accelerometer to measures and store activity continuously. Ten ICU participants will be recruited as a subsample from a larger project investigating weaning from long-term ventilation in an academic hospital. Participants are observed for two 4-hour blocks by trained observers concurrent with actigraphy using Motionlogger„¥ wrist devices. Intensity/type of activity, frequency, and length of time for mobilization are recorded. Descriptive and graphical analysis will describe mobilization activities. Patient-initiated activity is recorded using the Motor Activity Assessment Scale (MASS) as a baseline. Preliminary analysis in five patients indicates the most common mobilization activities were turning and ROM. Over eight hours, the average turning interval was 6.5 minutes with an averaged frequency of 3.4 times. The average interval for ROM was 7.8 minutes with only two frequencies. Actigraphy captured mobilization, displaying similar intensities, frequencies, and intervals for three participants. However, in two participants, actigraphy showed mobilization when none was observed. Actigraphy shows some promise as a measure of mobilization in the ICU. Further study is needed to understand why movement is obtained by actigraphy when none is observed directly. A surprisingly small number of mobilization activities occurred in these ICU participants. AN: MN030220
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Mobilization in the Adult Intensive Care Unit: A Preliminary Reporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159428-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Mobilization in the Adult Intensive Care Unit: A Preliminary Report </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winkelman, Chris </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave , Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yea-Jyh Kathy Chen; Patricia Higgins</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There are no established tools which measure mobilization or therapeutic activity in the critically ill population. Mobilization is used to prevent complications and preserve function during illness. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of actigraphy as a measure of mobilization in the intensive care unit (ICU). Mobilization is defined as therapeutic stretching of muscles, range of joint motion, and weight-bearing activity. Mobilization includes range of motion (ROM) exercise, turning in bed, dangling, chair sitting, and ambulation. This is a pilot study to explore the use of actigraphy to measure mobilization by comparing actigraphy to direct observation. Actigraphy uses a monitor containing an accelerometer to measures and store activity continuously. Ten ICU participants will be recruited as a subsample from a larger project investigating weaning from long-term ventilation in an academic hospital. Participants are observed for two 4-hour blocks by trained observers concurrent with actigraphy using Motionlogger&bdquo;&yen; wrist devices. Intensity/type of activity, frequency, and length of time for mobilization are recorded. Descriptive and graphical analysis will describe mobilization activities. Patient-initiated activity is recorded using the Motor Activity Assessment Scale (MASS) as a baseline. Preliminary analysis in five patients indicates the most common mobilization activities were turning and ROM. Over eight hours, the average turning interval was 6.5 minutes with an averaged frequency of 3.4 times. The average interval for ROM was 7.8 minutes with only two frequencies. Actigraphy captured mobilization, displaying similar intensities, frequencies, and intervals for three participants. However, in two participants, actigraphy showed mobilization when none was observed. Actigraphy shows some promise as a measure of mobilization in the ICU. Further study is needed to understand why movement is obtained by actigraphy when none is observed directly. A surprisingly small number of mobilization activities occurred in these ICU participants. AN: MN030220</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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