2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159432
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression and Acute Coronary Syndrome
Abstract:
Depression and Acute Coronary Syndrome
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Wung, Shu-Fen
Contact Address:Division of Nursing Practice, 1305 N. Martin Ave., Room 402, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA
Co-Authors:Mary Ann Bell; Hoang Thai; Steven Goldman
Cardiovascular disease and depression are intimately related. It has been hypothesized that depressed cardiac patients may have poorer control of cardiac risk factors because of poor diets, minimal exercise, and increased smoking rate. No study is available to compare risk factor control among depressed and nondepressed cardiac patients. A prospective study was designed to determine if untreated depression is correlated with poorer control of risk factors. Method: Within 12 hours of hospital admission, symptoms of depression were evaluated in 43 patients with acute coronary syndrome using a 21-item self-report rating Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A total score of 5-9 indicates no depression, 10-15 indicates mild to moderate depression, 19-29 indicates moderate to severe depression, and 30-63 indicates severe depression. Depression scores were correlated with HbA1c level, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, body mass index, blood pressure, and smoking habit. Results: Among these 43 patients, 13 (30%) had mild to moderate depression; three (7%) had moderate to severe depression, and one (2%) had a severe depression. Only 3 patients (7%) were treated with antidepressants. Depression score was not related to number of cardiac risk factors, age, marital status, or smoking history (p=NS). A significant higher proportion of nondepressed cardiac patients with diabetes (50%) had HbA1c < 6 than depressed cardiac patients with diabetes (27%) (p < 0.05). There was a trend indicating a positive correlation between total depression score and BMI (p=0.07). Obese cardiac patients were two-fold likely to suffer from depression than non-obese cardiac patients (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in blood pressure, LDL level, triglyceride level, and smoking history between depressed and nondepressed cardiac patients (p=NS). Conclusions: Major depression and depressive symptoms are frequently undertreated in patients with cardiovascular disease. Depressed cardiac patients tend to have poorer control of diabetes and obesity than nondepressed cardiac patients. AN: MN030121
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression and Acute Coronary Syndromeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159432-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression and Acute Coronary Syndrome </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wung, Shu-Fen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Nursing Practice, 1305 N. Martin Ave., Room 402, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Ann Bell; Hoang Thai; Steven Goldman </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cardiovascular disease and depression are intimately related. It has been hypothesized that depressed cardiac patients may have poorer control of cardiac risk factors because of poor diets, minimal exercise, and increased smoking rate. No study is available to compare risk factor control among depressed and nondepressed cardiac patients. A prospective study was designed to determine if untreated depression is correlated with poorer control of risk factors. Method: Within 12 hours of hospital admission, symptoms of depression were evaluated in 43 patients with acute coronary syndrome using a 21-item self-report rating Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A total score of 5-9 indicates no depression, 10-15 indicates mild to moderate depression, 19-29 indicates moderate to severe depression, and 30-63 indicates severe depression. Depression scores were correlated with HbA1c level, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, body mass index, blood pressure, and smoking habit. Results: Among these 43 patients, 13 (30%) had mild to moderate depression; three (7%) had moderate to severe depression, and one (2%) had a severe depression. Only 3 patients (7%) were treated with antidepressants. Depression score was not related to number of cardiac risk factors, age, marital status, or smoking history (p=NS). A significant higher proportion of nondepressed cardiac patients with diabetes (50%) had HbA1c &lt; 6 than depressed cardiac patients with diabetes (27%) (p &lt; 0.05). There was a trend indicating a positive correlation between total depression score and BMI (p=0.07). Obese cardiac patients were two-fold likely to suffer from depression than non-obese cardiac patients (p &lt; 0.05). No significant difference was found in blood pressure, LDL level, triglyceride level, and smoking history between depressed and nondepressed cardiac patients (p=NS). Conclusions: Major depression and depressive symptoms are frequently undertreated in patients with cardiovascular disease. Depressed cardiac patients tend to have poorer control of diabetes and obesity than nondepressed cardiac patients. AN: MN030121 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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