2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159433
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perioperative Pain during Radical Prostatectomy: a Trans-Theoretical Approach
Abstract:
Perioperative Pain during Radical Prostatectomy: a Trans-Theoretical Approach
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Yermal, Stephen
Contact Address:2160 S. First Avenue, McGuire Center, School of Nursing,, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Co-Authors:Herbert L. Mathews; Linda Janusek
Prostate cancer is the leading malignancy in men. Although clinical management of prostate cancer is controversial, radical prostatectomy is the most widely used form of treatment. Postoperative pain is associated with this form of clinical management. Pain and the psychological variables that modify pain may impact the immune response to cancer through neuroendocrine pathways, which link the brain and immune systems. Studies in animals demonstrate that pain suppresses Natural Killer (NK) cell activity; NK cells protect against tumor spread. However, little is known about the interactions among perioperative pain, psychological variables, and immune mechanisms involved in cancer control in humans. Thus, the purpose of this ongoing study is to examine the influence of perioperative pain on psychological variables (perceived stress, anxiety, mood, sense of coherence, and adaptation to cancer), immune (NK cell activity), and endocrine function (plasma endorphins) in radical prostatectomy patients. The dual frameworks guiding this study are H. S. Kim’s Typology of Four Domains for Nursing Knowledge Development and psychoneuroimmunology. Men (45-75 years) are evaluated prior to surgery, 1 and 2 days postoperatively, and 4-6 weeks following surgery. Results are compared to a group of age-matched, non-surgical, cancer-free men. Preliminary findings from 16 prostatectomy patients indicate significant correlations among mood (Profile of Mood States), anxiety (Spielberger State Anxiety), and pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire). Significant correlations are also demonstrated among mood, anxiety, and perceived stress (Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale). Moreover, patients reporting high levels of pain have significantly higher anxiety and greater mood disturbance compared to those reporting low levels of pain. At this point, the analysis of immune and endocrine variables is in progress. These preliminary data suggest that this trans-theoretical biobehavioral paradigm will provide an understanding of the effect of perioperative pain, psychological variables, and endocrine effects upon the immune system of patients undergoing tumor resection surgery. AN: MN030034
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerioperative Pain during Radical Prostatectomy: a Trans-Theoretical Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159433-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perioperative Pain during Radical Prostatectomy: a Trans-Theoretical Approach </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yermal, Stephen</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2160 S. First Avenue, McGuire Center, School of Nursing,, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Herbert L. Mathews; Linda Janusek</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Prostate cancer is the leading malignancy in men. Although clinical management of prostate cancer is controversial, radical prostatectomy is the most widely used form of treatment. Postoperative pain is associated with this form of clinical management. Pain and the psychological variables that modify pain may impact the immune response to cancer through neuroendocrine pathways, which link the brain and immune systems. Studies in animals demonstrate that pain suppresses Natural Killer (NK) cell activity; NK cells protect against tumor spread. However, little is known about the interactions among perioperative pain, psychological variables, and immune mechanisms involved in cancer control in humans. Thus, the purpose of this ongoing study is to examine the influence of perioperative pain on psychological variables (perceived stress, anxiety, mood, sense of coherence, and adaptation to cancer), immune (NK cell activity), and endocrine function (plasma endorphins) in radical prostatectomy patients. The dual frameworks guiding this study are H. S. Kim&rsquo;s Typology of Four Domains for Nursing Knowledge Development and psychoneuroimmunology. Men (45-75 years) are evaluated prior to surgery, 1 and 2 days postoperatively, and 4-6 weeks following surgery. Results are compared to a group of age-matched, non-surgical, cancer-free men. Preliminary findings from 16 prostatectomy patients indicate significant correlations among mood (Profile of Mood States), anxiety (Spielberger State Anxiety), and pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire). Significant correlations are also demonstrated among mood, anxiety, and perceived stress (Cohen&rsquo;s Perceived Stress Scale). Moreover, patients reporting high levels of pain have significantly higher anxiety and greater mood disturbance compared to those reporting low levels of pain. At this point, the analysis of immune and endocrine variables is in progress. These preliminary data suggest that this trans-theoretical biobehavioral paradigm will provide an understanding of the effect of perioperative pain, psychological variables, and endocrine effects upon the immune system of patients undergoing tumor resection surgery. AN: MN030034 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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