2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159434
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Mental Health Delivery Barriers Affecting American Indians
Abstract:
Rural Mental Health Delivery Barriers Affecting American Indians
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Yurkovich, Eleanor
Contact Address:CON, PO Box 9025 University Station, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-9025, USA
Co-Authors:Donna M. Grandbois
The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify the behavioral health services that exist for American Indians with chronic mental illness (CMI/SPMI), and barriers that interfere/restrict the delivery of mental health services on rural reservations. Symbolic Interactionism was used as the conceptual framework. The Surgeon General (2000) reported that mental health systems are ill equipped to meet the needs of lower socio-economic, ethnic, and racial minority populations. Minority groups are at greater risk for mental illness because of lower incomes, under-education, types of occupation, and acculturation. Because American Indians are the poorest of the poor, the percentage of MI is estimated to be 10 to 30%. Research on treatment of American Indians with CMI is sparse and dominated by a focus on acute and crisis oriented mental health problems. Qualitative content analysis was utilized to generate dominant patterns from transcribed audio-taped interviews (N=29) of mental health care providers at five IHS human service sites. Preliminary findings described existing services as outpatient therapy, crisis intervention, hospitalization for stabilization, and long term care at a state facility. The barriers affecting delivery of services are: inadequacy of funding, space, and staff; high turn-over of staff; inconsistent case management; lack of effective continuum of care; meager transportation to services; and a shortage of culturally responsive health education for clients, families and communities. Another barrier was the mind set among American Indians that minimizes or non-acknowledges the western perception of mental illness. Nursing ought to undo its' "individual orientation" and give attention to the social, economic, and political structure of the American Indian's society. Nurses need to advocate to the Federal Government, which has a trust responsibility based on treaties and court decisions to deliver quality health care to AI/AN, for the establishment of effective, culturally competent mental health systems. AN: MN030318
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Mental Health Delivery Barriers Affecting American Indiansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159434-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural Mental Health Delivery Barriers Affecting American Indians </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yurkovich, Eleanor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, PO Box 9025 University Station, Grand Forks, ND, 58202-9025, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donna M. Grandbois</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify the behavioral health services that exist for American Indians with chronic mental illness (CMI/SPMI), and barriers that interfere/restrict the delivery of mental health services on rural reservations. Symbolic Interactionism was used as the conceptual framework. The Surgeon General (2000) reported that mental health systems are ill equipped to meet the needs of lower socio-economic, ethnic, and racial minority populations. Minority groups are at greater risk for mental illness because of lower incomes, under-education, types of occupation, and acculturation. Because American Indians are the poorest of the poor, the percentage of MI is estimated to be 10 to 30%. Research on treatment of American Indians with CMI is sparse and dominated by a focus on acute and crisis oriented mental health problems. Qualitative content analysis was utilized to generate dominant patterns from transcribed audio-taped interviews (N=29) of mental health care providers at five IHS human service sites. Preliminary findings described existing services as outpatient therapy, crisis intervention, hospitalization for stabilization, and long term care at a state facility. The barriers affecting delivery of services are: inadequacy of funding, space, and staff; high turn-over of staff; inconsistent case management; lack of effective continuum of care; meager transportation to services; and a shortage of culturally responsive health education for clients, families and communities. Another barrier was the mind set among American Indians that minimizes or non-acknowledges the western perception of mental illness. Nursing ought to undo its' &quot;individual orientation&quot; and give attention to the social, economic, and political structure of the American Indian's society. Nurses need to advocate to the Federal Government, which has a trust responsibility based on treaties and court decisions to deliver quality health care to AI/AN, for the establishment of effective, culturally competent mental health systems. AN: MN030318 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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