2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159435
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model for Nurse Retention: Roles and Skills Needed by Managers
Abstract:
A Model for Nurse Retention: Roles and Skills Needed by Managers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Anthony, Mary, POD(R)
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA
Co-Authors:Theresa S Standing, POD(R), Assistant Professor; JoAnn Glick, MSN, RN; Martha Duffy, MSN, RN, Nursing Director; Francine Paschall, MSN, RN, Vice President; Mary Sauer, BSN, RN, Director
Purpose: To describe the perception of Nurse Manager (NM) roles and skills in facilitating retention relationships and whether these perceptions differed among NMs with different educational backgrounds. Conceptual Framework: Donabedian's framework was adapted to provide an a-priori framework for content analysis. Structure is the environment where NMs support patient care or the practice of nursing. Process includes technical and interpersonal activities occurring between managers and nurses, patients, and others. Outcomes are changes in unit function. Subjects: Of the 32 NMs working in 7 hospitals, most were women, 45 years of age with 21 years of nursing experience and 8 years experience as a NM and responsible for 31.7 RN FTEs. Methods: This qualitative descriptive design consisted of four focus groups with purposively sampled participants having similar educational backgrounds. Results: Content analysis of audiotape transcripts was managed with QRS5 software. Managers described their roles across all 4 dimensions of structure. Most roles were administrative (e. g. conflict resolution, meeting JCAHO requirements) or fiscal with less explicit description given to professional activities that related to retention. Key roles described as process included teamwork and communication. The skills managers need to promote retention were related to professional dimensions (e. g flexibility, role modeling) and administrative (e. g. fairness, risk taking) aspects of structure. Skills relating to process included coaching and championing nurses. Skills promoting retention were learned through trial and error. Unit characteristics facilitating retention were professional (good orientation), administrative (recognition) and fiscal (census. workload). Nurturance and teamwork were unit processes that supported retention. Outcomes including unit reputation and culture were important. Differences were noted across educational backgrounds in describing manager roles and skills. Conclusions: Structural aspects of the NMs role were identified most often and not explicitly related to retention. Identification of roles and skills differed among managers with varying educational backgrounds.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model for Nurse Retention: Roles and Skills Needed by Managersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159435-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Model for Nurse Retention: Roles and Skills Needed by Managers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anthony, Mary, POD(R)</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Theresa S Standing, POD(R), Assistant Professor; JoAnn Glick, MSN, RN; Martha Duffy, MSN, RN, Nursing Director; Francine Paschall, MSN, RN, Vice President; Mary Sauer, BSN, RN, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe the perception of Nurse Manager (NM) roles and skills in facilitating retention relationships and whether these perceptions differed among NMs with different educational backgrounds. Conceptual Framework: Donabedian's framework was adapted to provide an a-priori framework for content analysis. Structure is the environment where NMs support patient care or the practice of nursing. Process includes technical and interpersonal activities occurring between managers and nurses, patients, and others. Outcomes are changes in unit function. Subjects: Of the 32 NMs working in 7 hospitals, most were women, 45 years of age with 21 years of nursing experience and 8 years experience as a NM and responsible for 31.7 RN FTEs. Methods: This qualitative descriptive design consisted of four focus groups with purposively sampled participants having similar educational backgrounds. Results: Content analysis of audiotape transcripts was managed with QRS5 software. Managers described their roles across all 4 dimensions of structure. Most roles were administrative (e. g. conflict resolution, meeting JCAHO requirements) or fiscal with less explicit description given to professional activities that related to retention. Key roles described as process included teamwork and communication. The skills managers need to promote retention were related to professional dimensions (e. g flexibility, role modeling) and administrative (e. g. fairness, risk taking) aspects of structure. Skills relating to process included coaching and championing nurses. Skills promoting retention were learned through trial and error. Unit characteristics facilitating retention were professional (good orientation), administrative (recognition) and fiscal (census. workload). Nurturance and teamwork were unit processes that supported retention. Outcomes including unit reputation and culture were important. Differences were noted across educational backgrounds in describing manager roles and skills. Conclusions: Structural aspects of the NMs role were identified most often and not explicitly related to retention. Identification of roles and skills differed among managers with varying educational backgrounds. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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