2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159436
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Efficacy and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Men age 45 and Above
Abstract:
Self-Efficacy and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Men age 45 and Above
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Arras, Rita, PhD RN
Contact Address:SON, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA
The purpose of this research was to examine and explain health-promoting behaviors among men age 45 and older. The Health Promotion Model (HPM) was used as the framework for this study. Survey research methods were employed to measure barriers, benefits, self-efficacy, demographics, and self rated health (independent variables) and health-promoting behaviors (dependent variables). A total of 191 usable surveys were returned for a response rate of 39.2%. Men in the study were active employees or retirees from a Midwestern university or members of an American Legion Post. Regression models were developed using the independent variables to predict variance in health-promoting behaviors. Overall, 66% of the variation in total health-promoting behaviors (HPB) was accounted for by the independent variables. Similarly, a model was created for exercise HPB, and nutrition HPB. For exercise HPB, 65% of the variance was explained by the independent variables. For nutrition 53% of the variance was accounted for by the independent variables. Partial correlations revealed that self-efficacy was clearly the most important predictor for all three models. Higher ratings of self-efficacy were significantly associated with fewer reported barriers, more reported benefits, better reported health, and higher scores in all health-promoting behaviors. While men with more education and higher levels of income tended to have higher ratings of self-efficacy, there was no association between age and self-efficacy. Future studies and interventions should focus of developing and testing strategies to enhance self-efficacy for health-promoting behaviors among middle-aged and older men.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Efficacy and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Men age 45 and Aboveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159436-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Efficacy and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Men age 45 and Above </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Arras, Rita, PhD RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research was to examine and explain health-promoting behaviors among men age 45 and older. The Health Promotion Model (HPM) was used as the framework for this study. Survey research methods were employed to measure barriers, benefits, self-efficacy, demographics, and self rated health (independent variables) and health-promoting behaviors (dependent variables). A total of 191 usable surveys were returned for a response rate of 39.2%. Men in the study were active employees or retirees from a Midwestern university or members of an American Legion Post. Regression models were developed using the independent variables to predict variance in health-promoting behaviors. Overall, 66% of the variation in total health-promoting behaviors (HPB) was accounted for by the independent variables. Similarly, a model was created for exercise HPB, and nutrition HPB. For exercise HPB, 65% of the variance was explained by the independent variables. For nutrition 53% of the variance was accounted for by the independent variables. Partial correlations revealed that self-efficacy was clearly the most important predictor for all three models. Higher ratings of self-efficacy were significantly associated with fewer reported barriers, more reported benefits, better reported health, and higher scores in all health-promoting behaviors. While men with more education and higher levels of income tended to have higher ratings of self-efficacy, there was no association between age and self-efficacy. Future studies and interventions should focus of developing and testing strategies to enhance self-efficacy for health-promoting behaviors among middle-aged and older men. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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