2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159438
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dangerous Wandering: Elopements from Long-Term Care Facilities
Abstract:
Dangerous Wandering: Elopements from Long-Term Care Facilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Aud, Myra, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Sinclair SON, Building (S422), Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Wandering is a common, and often benign, behavior among older adults with Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia. However, when wandering around becomes wandering away, the older adults with dementia are at high risk of injury. Family members and long-term care providers are concerned about the dangers of elopement whether from a private home or a long-term care facility. This exploratory qualitative study identified patterns in elopements of 62 elderly long-term care facility residents with dementia. The data consisted of notices of non-compliance issued to 50 licensed long-term care facilities by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services between January 1999 and June 2001. Accounts of the incidents in the notices described the circumstances of the elopements, environmental risks, and injuries sustained. Content analysis identified patterns that included: (a) lack of effective precautions to prevent elopement when residents had indicated intent to elope, had repeatedly attempted to elope, or had a history of elopement incidents; (b) lack of awareness by the staff of the locations of residents, and (c) ineffective use of alarm devices intended to alert staff to elopement attempts. These patterns suggest approaches to increase the safety for older adults with dementia in long-term care facilities, but because of the limited research in this area, further studies are necessary.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDangerous Wandering: Elopements from Long-Term Care Facilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159438-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dangerous Wandering: Elopements from Long-Term Care Facilities </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aud, Myra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair SON, Building (S422), Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Wandering is a common, and often benign, behavior among older adults with Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease or another type of dementia. However, when wandering around becomes wandering away, the older adults with dementia are at high risk of injury. Family members and long-term care providers are concerned about the dangers of elopement whether from a private home or a long-term care facility. This exploratory qualitative study identified patterns in elopements of 62 elderly long-term care facility residents with dementia. The data consisted of notices of non-compliance issued to 50 licensed long-term care facilities by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services between January 1999 and June 2001. Accounts of the incidents in the notices described the circumstances of the elopements, environmental risks, and injuries sustained. Content analysis identified patterns that included: (a) lack of effective precautions to prevent elopement when residents had indicated intent to elope, had repeatedly attempted to elope, or had a history of elopement incidents; (b) lack of awareness by the staff of the locations of residents, and (c) ineffective use of alarm devices intended to alert staff to elopement attempts. These patterns suggest approaches to increase the safety for older adults with dementia in long-term care facilities, but because of the limited research in this area, further studies are necessary. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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