2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159439
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A PET study of the effect of self-selected music on pain responses
Abstract:
A PET study of the effect of self-selected music on pain responses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Baker, Susan, DNS, RN
Title:Pain Management Consultant
Contact Address:, 3135 Blodgett Drive, Colorado Spgs, CO, 80919-4513, USA
Co-Authors:Juanita Fogel Keck, DNS, RN, Professor
Pain is a multidimensional, subjective experience with affective, cognitive, behavioral and sensory components. Neuronal pathways exist that suggest that auditory stimuli have the potential to modify pain these pain responses via the anterior cingulate (ACC) of the limbic area of the brain. Recent imaging by PET and MRI have identified a nociceptive region in the ACC in which regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is elevated in response to noxious stimuli. If music were to alter the unpleasantness or distress of the painful stimulus by focused disattention, providing distraction and creating a positive emotional reaction, then a change in the response of the ACC to the pain should occur. The proposed hypothesis for this pilot study to investigate the potential for an expanded study was that there would be a significant reduction rCBF in the ACC in response to listening to self-selected music while experiencing painful stimuli. A convenience sample of 4 individuals, 2 males and 2 females who were in general good health and predominately right-handed participated following human subjects approval. Each person participated in repeated trials of thermal pain alone followed by thermal pain plus music. Music was provided by a CD player with headphones. Pain was initiated experimentally by tonic thermal stimulation of nociceptors in the thenar aspect of the palm. Pain perception was recorded using two 11-point numeric scales, one rating discomfort (0=no discomfort; 10=excruciating) and the other intensity (0=no pain; 10=worse pain). Data were analyzed using Z-score comparisons and a repeated measures statistical design. Although not statistically significant due to the small sample, there was a 60% reduction in rCBF among the 4 participants when music was added. Study results provide initial support for the effectiveness of self-selected music to alter the pain responses of individuals through limbic-mediated pathways.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA PET study of the effect of self-selected music on pain responsesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159439-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A PET study of the effect of self-selected music on pain responses </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baker, Susan, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pain Management Consultant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, 3135 Blodgett Drive, Colorado Spgs, CO, 80919-4513, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Juanita Fogel Keck, DNS, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is a multidimensional, subjective experience with affective, cognitive, behavioral and sensory components. Neuronal pathways exist that suggest that auditory stimuli have the potential to modify pain these pain responses via the anterior cingulate (ACC) of the limbic area of the brain. Recent imaging by PET and MRI have identified a nociceptive region in the ACC in which regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is elevated in response to noxious stimuli. If music were to alter the unpleasantness or distress of the painful stimulus by focused disattention, providing distraction and creating a positive emotional reaction, then a change in the response of the ACC to the pain should occur. The proposed hypothesis for this pilot study to investigate the potential for an expanded study was that there would be a significant reduction rCBF in the ACC in response to listening to self-selected music while experiencing painful stimuli. A convenience sample of 4 individuals, 2 males and 2 females who were in general good health and predominately right-handed participated following human subjects approval. Each person participated in repeated trials of thermal pain alone followed by thermal pain plus music. Music was provided by a CD player with headphones. Pain was initiated experimentally by tonic thermal stimulation of nociceptors in the thenar aspect of the palm. Pain perception was recorded using two 11-point numeric scales, one rating discomfort (0=no discomfort; 10=excruciating) and the other intensity (0=no pain; 10=worse pain). Data were analyzed using Z-score comparisons and a repeated measures statistical design. Although not statistically significant due to the small sample, there was a 60% reduction in rCBF among the 4 participants when music was added. Study results provide initial support for the effectiveness of self-selected music to alter the pain responses of individuals through limbic-mediated pathways.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:00:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:00:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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