A Chorus of Voices: The Socio-Political Empowerment of Nurses Through the Use of Liberatory Pedagogy in an Online Policy Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159440
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Chorus of Voices: The Socio-Political Empowerment of Nurses Through the Use of Liberatory Pedagogy in an Online Policy Course
Abstract:
A Chorus of Voices: The Socio-Political Empowerment of Nurses Through the Use of Liberatory Pedagogy in an Online Policy Course
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Ballou, Kathryn, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 2220 Holmes Rd.- Room 246, Kansas City, MO, 66209, USA
Co-Authors:David M. Antonacci, MS, Manager IS Training and Communications
The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not teaching a masters level policy course using a liberatory pedagogical style (hooks, 1994; Shor, 1992) in an online course format could socio-politically empower nurses. Most masters students have little knowledge of health-care policy and find it difficult and risky to voice social and political critique in public settings, in part due to their depoliticized educational and workplace role socialization. Consequently, face-to-face engagement of students in critical dialogue about health care policy and politics can be frustrating for both students and faculty. A nursing faculty member and an educational technology expert within a Midwestern university developed an online policy course to encourage intense but safe student engagement and socio-political empowerment. Thirty masters nursing students from the US and two foreign countries completed the two-credit hour policy course in summer of 2003. The online format included numerous asynchronous forums and three synchronous chats. There were two formal written assignments and extensive reading, but no lectures or faculty presentations. The faculty used a liberatory pedagogical style within course design and interactions with students. Content analysis within this educational case study was used to analyze hundreds of student postings within the course. Cohen et al’s (1996) theoretical stages of political development helped to partially frame the findings. Most students moved from stage one into the political sophistication stage (stage three of four) and one student progressed to stage four. Students commented that they felt safer in the online format, and applied the course content to everyday practical nursing problems in dozens of lengthy discussions. The majority of students quickly achieved a level of socio-political savvy that involved both action and rhetoric. We highly recommend using liberatory pedagogy in combination with online format for purposes of socio-political empowerment of nurses within a policy course.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Chorus of Voices: The Socio-Political Empowerment of Nurses Through the Use of Liberatory Pedagogy in an Online Policy Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159440-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Chorus of Voices: The Socio-Political Empowerment of Nurses Through the Use of Liberatory Pedagogy in an Online Policy Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ballou, Kathryn, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 2220 Holmes Rd.- Room 246, Kansas City, MO, 66209, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">David M. Antonacci, MS, Manager IS Training and Communications</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not teaching a masters level policy course using a liberatory pedagogical style (hooks, 1994; Shor, 1992) in an online course format could socio-politically empower nurses. Most masters students have little knowledge of health-care policy and find it difficult and risky to voice social and political critique in public settings, in part due to their depoliticized educational and workplace role socialization. Consequently, face-to-face engagement of students in critical dialogue about health care policy and politics can be frustrating for both students and faculty. A nursing faculty member and an educational technology expert within a Midwestern university developed an online policy course to encourage intense but safe student engagement and socio-political empowerment. Thirty masters nursing students from the US and two foreign countries completed the two-credit hour policy course in summer of 2003. The online format included numerous asynchronous forums and three synchronous chats. There were two formal written assignments and extensive reading, but no lectures or faculty presentations. The faculty used a liberatory pedagogical style within course design and interactions with students. Content analysis within this educational case study was used to analyze hundreds of student postings within the course. Cohen et al&rsquo;s (1996) theoretical stages of political development helped to partially frame the findings. Most students moved from stage one into the political sophistication stage (stage three of four) and one student progressed to stage four. Students commented that they felt safer in the online format, and applied the course content to everyday practical nursing problems in dozens of lengthy discussions. The majority of students quickly achieved a level of socio-political savvy that involved both action and rhetoric. We highly recommend using liberatory pedagogy in combination with online format for purposes of socio-political empowerment of nurses within a policy course. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:01:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:01:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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