Graduate Nurses' Perceptions of Their Baccalaureate Final Semester Clinical Preceptorship Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159444
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Graduate Nurses' Perceptions of Their Baccalaureate Final Semester Clinical Preceptorship Experience
Abstract:
Graduate Nurses' Perceptions of Their Baccalaureate Final Semester Clinical Preceptorship Experience
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bernaix, Laura, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 64 Santa Anita Dr, Edwardsville,, IL, 62062-1928 , USA
Co-Authors:Cynthia A. Schmidt, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Rebecca Caswell, BS, RN, Staff Nurse
Nurse staffing shortages, increased patient acuity levels, and shortened patient hospital stays have created a challenging hospital work environment. Graduate nurses, in particular, are feeling overwhelmed, and often times, incompetent in their role. Nurse educators and administrators, therefore, have searched for ways to reduce this "new nurse reality shock". Clinical preceptorship programs during the final senior semester have been proclaimed by many to be the most helpful strategy. But while these programs are very popular, little research has validated their efficacy and no studies have taken into account student perspectives. The purpose of this study was to explore recent nursing graduates' perceptions of their final semester's clinical preceptorship experience. Using Benner's Novice to Expert Model as the theoretical framework, this descriptive, correlational study utilized a mailed survey design for the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data. Developed based upon a literature review, the tool was reviewed for content validity by two nurse researchers and then pilot tested. Cronbach alpha for the tool's subscales ranged from .94 to .96. Data analysis, which included descriptive statistics, t-tests, and Pearson's r correlations, revealed that the sample size of 49 graduate nurses perceived their clinical preceptorship as helpful in preparing them for the real world of nursing. Further, the more expert the preceptor, the more the student felt prepared to assume their role as graduate nurse. Qualitative data also revealed several interesting themes regarding the clinical preceptorship experience. Implications from these results suggest that students and employers benefit from this type of learning experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGraduate Nurses' Perceptions of Their Baccalaureate Final Semester Clinical Preceptorship Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159444-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Graduate Nurses' Perceptions of Their Baccalaureate Final Semester Clinical Preceptorship Experience </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernaix, Laura, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 64 Santa Anita Dr, Edwardsville,, IL, 62062-1928 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia A. Schmidt, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Rebecca Caswell, BS, RN, Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurse staffing shortages, increased patient acuity levels, and shortened patient hospital stays have created a challenging hospital work environment. Graduate nurses, in particular, are feeling overwhelmed, and often times, incompetent in their role. Nurse educators and administrators, therefore, have searched for ways to reduce this &quot;new nurse reality shock&quot;. Clinical preceptorship programs during the final senior semester have been proclaimed by many to be the most helpful strategy. But while these programs are very popular, little research has validated their efficacy and no studies have taken into account student perspectives. The purpose of this study was to explore recent nursing graduates' perceptions of their final semester's clinical preceptorship experience. Using Benner's Novice to Expert Model as the theoretical framework, this descriptive, correlational study utilized a mailed survey design for the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data. Developed based upon a literature review, the tool was reviewed for content validity by two nurse researchers and then pilot tested. Cronbach alpha for the tool's subscales ranged from .94 to .96. Data analysis, which included descriptive statistics, t-tests, and Pearson's r correlations, revealed that the sample size of 49 graduate nurses perceived their clinical preceptorship as helpful in preparing them for the real world of nursing. Further, the more expert the preceptor, the more the student felt prepared to assume their role as graduate nurse. Qualitative data also revealed several interesting themes regarding the clinical preceptorship experience. Implications from these results suggest that students and employers benefit from this type of learning experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:01:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:01:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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