2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159445
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Biobehavioral Consequences of Chronic Neuropathic Pain (CNP)
Abstract:
Biobehavioral Consequences of Chronic Neuropathic Pain (CNP)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Blakely, Wendy, PhD, RN
Contact Address:SON, 525 North Wolfe Street - Room 030, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA
Co-Authors:Grace Ramaiah, RN, RM; Gayle G. Page, DNSc, RN, FAAN
Conceptual Framework. Nearly half of cancer survivors suffer from chronic pain, of which over 30% is neuropathic, a consequence of nerve injury. Acute pain has been shown to activate the stress response and enhance metastatic susceptibility. Few studies have reported the effects of CNP on immunity, and none have examined the impact of CNP on anti-tumor immune defenses. . Purpose & Sample. Using an established CNP model, spinal nerve ligation (SNL), in male Fischer-344 rats, characterize SNL effects on the following outcomes over the first six weeks postoperative. · CNP behaviors: mechanical allodynia, evidenced by abnormal paw withdrawal to innocuous tactile stimuli. · immunity: spinal cord cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-g) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), respectively reflecting cellular and antibody-mediated immune activity; and lung clearance of syngeneic natural killer cell (NK)-sensitive mammary adenocarcinoma (MADB106) cells. · neuroendocrine stress response: plasma corticosterone. Methods. A 2 x 7 factorial design was employed: SNL vs. sham surgery; by seven postoperative time points; plus an untreated control group. Behavioral testing was conducted at baseline and five postoperative time points. Sixteen hours before blood and organ harvesting, radiolabeled MADB106 cells were injected intravenously. These cells metastasize only to the lungs; tumor clearance was assessed by measuring lung radioactivity. Cytokines and corticosterone were assayed using commercial kits. Results & Conclusions. Although CNP behaviors were consistently evident in animals that underwent SNL, there was no significant effect of CNP on corticosterone levels or NK-mediated tumor cell destruction. Spinal cord IL-4 was significantly increased and IFN-g/IL-4 ratio significantly decreased in SNL animals, indicating a predominance of antibody-mediated over cellular immunity. Numerous human and animal studies have associated similar cytokine alterations with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Findings from this study may provide insight into the potential impact of CNP on anti-tumor defenses and pave the way for intervention studies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBiobehavioral Consequences of Chronic Neuropathic Pain (CNP)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159445-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Biobehavioral Consequences of Chronic Neuropathic Pain (CNP) </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blakely, Wendy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 525 North Wolfe Street - Room 030, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Grace Ramaiah, RN, RM; Gayle G. Page, DNSc, RN, FAAN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Conceptual Framework. Nearly half of cancer survivors suffer from chronic pain, of which over 30% is neuropathic, a consequence of nerve injury. Acute pain has been shown to activate the stress response and enhance metastatic susceptibility. Few studies have reported the effects of CNP on immunity, and none have examined the impact of CNP on anti-tumor immune defenses. . Purpose &amp; Sample. Using an established CNP model, spinal nerve ligation (SNL), in male Fischer-344 rats, characterize SNL effects on the following outcomes over the first six weeks postoperative. &middot; CNP behaviors: mechanical allodynia, evidenced by abnormal paw withdrawal to innocuous tactile stimuli. &middot; immunity: spinal cord cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-g) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), respectively reflecting cellular and antibody-mediated immune activity; and lung clearance of syngeneic natural killer cell (NK)-sensitive mammary adenocarcinoma (MADB106) cells. &middot; neuroendocrine stress response: plasma corticosterone. Methods. A 2 x 7 factorial design was employed: SNL vs. sham surgery; by seven postoperative time points; plus an untreated control group. Behavioral testing was conducted at baseline and five postoperative time points. Sixteen hours before blood and organ harvesting, radiolabeled MADB106 cells were injected intravenously. These cells metastasize only to the lungs; tumor clearance was assessed by measuring lung radioactivity. Cytokines and corticosterone were assayed using commercial kits. Results &amp; Conclusions. Although CNP behaviors were consistently evident in animals that underwent SNL, there was no significant effect of CNP on corticosterone levels or NK-mediated tumor cell destruction. Spinal cord IL-4 was significantly increased and IFN-g/IL-4 ratio significantly decreased in SNL animals, indicating a predominance of antibody-mediated over cellular immunity. Numerous human and animal studies have associated similar cytokine alterations with tumor progression and poor prognosis. Findings from this study may provide insight into the potential impact of CNP on anti-tumor defenses and pave the way for intervention studies. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:01:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:01:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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