2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159447
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life Trajectories of Terminally Ill Elders
Abstract:
Quality of Life Trajectories of Terminally Ill Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bruley, Deborah, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Contact Address:Division of Nursing, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL, 60914, USA
Co-Authors:Marquis D. Foreman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Carol E. Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Purpose: To examine the elements of quality of life (QOL) for terminally ill elders, throughout end of life and to identify potential trajectories of quality of life. Conceptual Framework: Ferrans Conceptual Model of Quality of Life Subjects: 13 advanced cancer patients with a prognosis of 4-6 months, 63-78 years of age, and 5 respective caregivers. Method: Repeated measures design. Weekly interviews were conducted until death, over a period of 4 to 83 weeks. Ten instruments were used to measure quality of life, and physical, psychological, social, and spiritual functioning. Results: Various trajectories of QOL were identified: Stable QOL, Erratic QOL, and Gradual Improvement in QOL. Physical and psychological symptoms and psychological outlook/perspective varied with different patterns of QOL. Erratic QOL patients had elevated levels of anxiety. Conclusion: This is the first study of which we are aware to identify individual trajectories of QOL, and important implications for theory, practice, and research result. Accurately using QOL as an outcome measure requires consideration of the individual’s trajectory of QOL. Interventions to decrease anxiety may stabilize the trajectory of QOL. Acknowledgments: This research was funded by individual pre-doctoral fellowship grants from the Institute for Nursing Research 1F31NR07472-01 and the American Cancer Society DSCN-00185-01.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life Trajectories of Terminally Ill Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159447-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life Trajectories of Terminally Ill Elders </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bruley, Deborah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Nursing, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL, 60914, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marquis D. Foreman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Carol E. Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine the elements of quality of life (QOL) for terminally ill elders, throughout end of life and to identify potential trajectories of quality of life. Conceptual Framework: Ferrans Conceptual Model of Quality of Life Subjects: 13 advanced cancer patients with a prognosis of 4-6 months, 63-78 years of age, and 5 respective caregivers. Method: Repeated measures design. Weekly interviews were conducted until death, over a period of 4 to 83 weeks. Ten instruments were used to measure quality of life, and physical, psychological, social, and spiritual functioning. Results: Various trajectories of QOL were identified: Stable QOL, Erratic QOL, and Gradual Improvement in QOL. Physical and psychological symptoms and psychological outlook/perspective varied with different patterns of QOL. Erratic QOL patients had elevated levels of anxiety. Conclusion: This is the first study of which we are aware to identify individual trajectories of QOL, and important implications for theory, practice, and research result. Accurately using QOL as an outcome measure requires consideration of the individual&rsquo;s trajectory of QOL. Interventions to decrease anxiety may stabilize the trajectory of QOL. Acknowledgments: This research was funded by individual pre-doctoral fellowship grants from the Institute for Nursing Research 1F31NR07472-01 and the American Cancer Society DSCN-00185-01. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:01:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:01:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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