2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159448
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Does Quality of Life Mean to Cancer Patients at the End of Life?
Abstract:
What Does Quality of Life Mean to Cancer Patients at the End of Life?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bruley, Deborah, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Division of Nursing, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL, 60914, USA
Co-Authors:Marquis D. Foreman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Kathleen Knafl, PhD, FAAN, Professor
Purpose: To examine elements of quality of life (QOL) for terminally ill elders. Conceptual Framework: Ferrans Conceptual Model of Quality of Life Subjects: 13 advanced cancer patients with a prognosis of 4-6 months, 63-78 years of age, and 5 respective caregivers. Method: In this prospective, mixed-method longitudinal study, weekly interviews were conducted with subjects who completed measures of QOL, and physical, psychological, social, and spiritual functioning. At each visit, subjects also participated in a brief open-ended interview that addressed the meaning and elements of QOL. Results: Terminally ill patients’ discussions of QOL revolved around: physical functioning, family, and spiritual matters. Many research studies combine family concerns into one item, in this study six themes emerged: relationship with spouse, relationship with children, grandchildren/extended family, children’s relationship with God, children’s maturity/independence, and children’s relationship with their siblings. Patients and caregivers were also asked their expectations of healthcare providers and 6 themes emerged: honest communication, competent care/symptom management, cure, prolong life, prompt treatment, and uncertain expectations. Conclusion: The importance of family, in caring for patients at the end of life, should not be underestimated. Educators, clinicians, and researchers should attend to patients’ and families’ expectations of care, which for these terminally ill advanced cancer patients in the United States, was first of all, honest communication. Acknowledgments: This research was funded by individual pre-doctoral fellowship grants from the Institute for Nursing Research 1F31NR07472-01 and the American Cancer Society DSCN-00185-01.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Does Quality of Life Mean to Cancer Patients at the End of Life?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159448-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What Does Quality of Life Mean to Cancer Patients at the End of Life?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bruley, Deborah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Nursing, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL, 60914, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marquis D. Foreman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Kathleen Knafl, PhD, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine elements of quality of life (QOL) for terminally ill elders. Conceptual Framework: Ferrans Conceptual Model of Quality of Life Subjects: 13 advanced cancer patients with a prognosis of 4-6 months, 63-78 years of age, and 5 respective caregivers. Method: In this prospective, mixed-method longitudinal study, weekly interviews were conducted with subjects who completed measures of QOL, and physical, psychological, social, and spiritual functioning. At each visit, subjects also participated in a brief open-ended interview that addressed the meaning and elements of QOL. Results: Terminally ill patients&rsquo; discussions of QOL revolved around: physical functioning, family, and spiritual matters. Many research studies combine family concerns into one item, in this study six themes emerged: relationship with spouse, relationship with children, grandchildren/extended family, children&rsquo;s relationship with God, children&rsquo;s maturity/independence, and children&rsquo;s relationship with their siblings. Patients and caregivers were also asked their expectations of healthcare providers and 6 themes emerged: honest communication, competent care/symptom management, cure, prolong life, prompt treatment, and uncertain expectations. Conclusion: The importance of family, in caring for patients at the end of life, should not be underestimated. Educators, clinicians, and researchers should attend to patients&rsquo; and families&rsquo; expectations of care, which for these terminally ill advanced cancer patients in the United States, was first of all, honest communication. Acknowledgments: This research was funded by individual pre-doctoral fellowship grants from the Institute for Nursing Research 1F31NR07472-01 and the American Cancer Society DSCN-00185-01.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:01:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:01:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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