Obesity and Physical Activity in College Females: Implications for Clinical Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159452
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Obesity and Physical Activity in College Females: Implications for Clinical Practice
Abstract:
Obesity and Physical Activity in College Females: Implications for Clinical Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Clement, Jacquelyn, PhD, APRN-BC, FNP
Title:Professor & Graduate Program Director
Contact Address:SON, Alumni Hall - Room 2124, Campus Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA
Co-Authors:Laura Bernaix, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Cynthia Schmidt, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Kay Covington, PhD, Associate Professor; T. R. Carr, PhD, Professor
According to the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (2000), 56% of women in the United States are considered either to be overweight or obese. The literature reveals that the prevalence of physical inactivity and the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet are more prevalent among women than men and perpetuate the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and obesity (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996). The purpose of this ongoing descriptive, correlational study was to investigate the relationships among levels of physical activity, health attitudes and behaviors, and specific health indicators in females attending college. Prochaska's Transtheoretical Change Model served as the theoretical framework. The initial convenience sample of 116 college females, ages 18-24 years, at a moderate-sized Midwestern university, completed a self-administered questionnaire; physiologic measures were collected by trained technicians. Data analysis included descriptive and correlational statistics. Findings indicated that the young women in this study had, on average, normal body mass indices (BMIs) and reported activity levels consistent with or greater than the CDC/ACSM guidelines. When nutrition behaviors were examined, some weak yet significant correlations were identified between poor nutrition habits and BMI and physical activity levels. Participants whose Transtheoretical Model scores indicated a long-term commitment to physical activity and exercise, reported greater levels of physical activity, consumption of more fruits/vegetables and water, and less consumption of high fat/calorie foods. Although BMI and physical activity levels for this group would ordinarily be considered healthy, the reported negative health habits could lead to obesity and related health problems. As reported by the CDC (2001), as women age, they are more likely to become overweight or obese. Nurse Practitioners have many opportunities to identify and address major factors that, if unattended, may threaten the life-long health status of women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleObesity and Physical Activity in College Females: Implications for Clinical Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159452-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Obesity and Physical Activity in College Females: Implications for Clinical Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clement, Jacquelyn, PhD, APRN-BC, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Graduate Program Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Alumni Hall - Room 2124, Campus Box 1066, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1066, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laura Bernaix, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Cynthia Schmidt, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Kay Covington, PhD, Associate Professor; T. R. Carr, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">According to the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (2000), 56% of women in the United States are considered either to be overweight or obese. The literature reveals that the prevalence of physical inactivity and the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet are more prevalent among women than men and perpetuate the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and obesity (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996). The purpose of this ongoing descriptive, correlational study was to investigate the relationships among levels of physical activity, health attitudes and behaviors, and specific health indicators in females attending college. Prochaska's Transtheoretical Change Model served as the theoretical framework. The initial convenience sample of 116 college females, ages 18-24 years, at a moderate-sized Midwestern university, completed a self-administered questionnaire; physiologic measures were collected by trained technicians. Data analysis included descriptive and correlational statistics. Findings indicated that the young women in this study had, on average, normal body mass indices (BMIs) and reported activity levels consistent with or greater than the CDC/ACSM guidelines. When nutrition behaviors were examined, some weak yet significant correlations were identified between poor nutrition habits and BMI and physical activity levels. Participants whose Transtheoretical Model scores indicated a long-term commitment to physical activity and exercise, reported greater levels of physical activity, consumption of more fruits/vegetables and water, and less consumption of high fat/calorie foods. Although BMI and physical activity levels for this group would ordinarily be considered healthy, the reported negative health habits could lead to obesity and related health problems. As reported by the CDC (2001), as women age, they are more likely to become overweight or obese. Nurse Practitioners have many opportunities to identify and address major factors that, if unattended, may threaten the life-long health status of women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:01:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:01:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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