2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159454
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Patterns in Postoperative Patients
Abstract:
Sleep Patterns in Postoperative Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Cong, Xiaomei, MSN, RN
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA
Co-Authors:Marion Good, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
The purpose of this study was to explore sleep patterns in postoperative abdominal surgery patients. Based on the proposition that critically ill patients have fragmented and disturbed nocturnal sleep (Richards et al, 2000), we used a correlational design to examine sleep patterns and relationships in postoperative patients. The sample included 232 adults (79% female), 19-75 years, at a tertiary hospital. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire was used to measure five sleep factors on 100mm VAS scales. Subjects were also asked to report what, if anything, awakened them during the night. Sleep was measured each morning for the previous night: night before surgery (BS), and postoperative nights 1, 2, and 3 (nights 1,2,3). The total score was the mean of the five VAS factors (0=poorest sleep, 100=optimum sleep). Total sleep scores for BS, and nights 1,2,3 were 51±28, 51±26, 57±25, and 62±24, respectively. The major reasons reported for postoperative sleep disturbance were: Reasons Night 1 Night 2 Night 3 Nursing checks/care 35% 20% 15% Pain 20% – 15% Urinate – 22% 16% Poorer sleep was significantly correlated with higher pain scores each postoperative day (r=-.16 to -.47). Poorer sleep on nights 2 and 3 was related to less daytime activity (r=.17 to .25), and more opioid side effects (r=-.21 to -.24), complications (r=-.21); and more days until PCA discontinued (r=-.17, p=.018), bowel sounds heard (r=-.19), and hospital discharge (r=-.22). Abdominal surgical patients’ sleep disturbances were worst the night before surgery and only improved a little by night 3. Postoperative patients have fragmented and disturbed sleep, but the direction of causation was not clear. Nurse researchers need to study interventions to improve sleep before and after surgery to see if they reduce discomforts and improve outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Patterns in Postoperative Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159454-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Patterns in Postoperative Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cong, Xiaomei, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marion Good, PhD, RN, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore sleep patterns in postoperative abdominal surgery patients. Based on the proposition that critically ill patients have fragmented and disturbed nocturnal sleep (Richards et al, 2000), we used a correlational design to examine sleep patterns and relationships in postoperative patients. The sample included 232 adults (79% female), 19-75 years, at a tertiary hospital. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire was used to measure five sleep factors on 100mm VAS scales. Subjects were also asked to report what, if anything, awakened them during the night. Sleep was measured each morning for the previous night: night before surgery (BS), and postoperative nights 1, 2, and 3 (nights 1,2,3). The total score was the mean of the five VAS factors (0=poorest sleep, 100=optimum sleep). Total sleep scores for BS, and nights 1,2,3 were 51&plusmn;28, 51&plusmn;26, 57&plusmn;25, and 62&plusmn;24, respectively. The major reasons reported for postoperative sleep disturbance were: Reasons Night 1 Night 2 Night 3 Nursing checks/care 35% 20% 15% Pain 20% &ndash; 15% Urinate &ndash; 22% 16% Poorer sleep was significantly correlated with higher pain scores each postoperative day (r=-.16 to -.47). Poorer sleep on nights 2 and 3 was related to less daytime activity (r=.17 to .25), and more opioid side effects (r=-.21 to -.24), complications (r=-.21); and more days until PCA discontinued (r=-.17, p=.018), bowel sounds heard (r=-.19), and hospital discharge (r=-.22). Abdominal surgical patients&rsquo; sleep disturbances were worst the night before surgery and only improved a little by night 3. Postoperative patients have fragmented and disturbed sleep, but the direction of causation was not clear. Nurse researchers need to study interventions to improve sleep before and after surgery to see if they reduce discomforts and improve outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:01:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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