2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159456
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Two Methods of Occipital Pressure Relief in Hospitalized Children
Abstract:
A Comparison of Two Methods of Occipital Pressure Relief in Hospitalized Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Cuddigan, Janet, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON , 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330 , USA
Co-Authors:Cindy R. Brown, MSN, RN, Nurse Practitioner; AnneMarie DeVoll-Zabrocki, BS, BSN, RN, Graduate Student; Simon P. Horslen, MB, ChB, FRCPCH, Associate Professor
The purposes of this study were to: describe pressure loading characteristics of children of various ages and sizes; compare pressure-reducing characteristics of two different gel pads (flat vs. horseshoe-shaped) under the head; and determine whether a handheld pressure monitor accurately measures peak interface pressures when compared to full body pressure mapping system. Conceptual Framework: The Braden-Bergstrom conceptual framework for pressure ulcer development was used, with a focus on pressure. Subjects: Subjects were 39 hospitalized children, aged 1-month to 17 years. Methods: Total body pressure mapping was conducted (using the Xsensor Pressure Mapping System) with subjects in supine position on a standard crib or mattress. Pressure mapping of the occiput area was completed under each of three conditions: standard mattress or crib, flat gel pad, and horseshoe-shaped gel pad. Pressure mapping images were analyzed for peak pressure, average pressure, and contact area under all bony prominences, under each of the three conditions. Using a TherapointTM handheld monitor, peak pressure measurements were repeated under bony prominences in a subset of 30 subjects lying supine on a standard crib or mattress. Results: Infants and toddlers tended to load most heavily on occipital areas. As children age, a greater proportion pressure is distributed over buttocks and heels, yet occipital pressure may remain sufficiently high to warrant concern. Using paired t-tests, the flat gel condition showed significantly lower peak pressures (t=3.441, p=.001), average pressures (t=4.475, p<.000), and significantly greater contact area (t=-2.290, p=.028) than control condition. Peak pressures were significantly lower for the flat vs. horseshoe shaped gel (t=-2.928, p=.006). There was a statistically significant correlation between handheld device and Xsensor peak pressures for left heel (r=.759, p=.000) and right heel (r=.618, p=.000). Conclusions: Pressure loading patterns vary as children age. The flat gel provided greater reduction of peak pressure than horseshoe gel. Further work is required to improve the accuracy of the handheld monitor.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Two Methods of Occipital Pressure Relief in Hospitalized Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159456-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison of Two Methods of Occipital Pressure Relief in Hospitalized Children </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cuddigan, Janet, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON , 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindy R. Brown, MSN, RN, Nurse Practitioner; AnneMarie DeVoll-Zabrocki, BS, BSN, RN, Graduate Student; Simon P. Horslen, MB, ChB, FRCPCH, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this study were to: describe pressure loading characteristics of children of various ages and sizes; compare pressure-reducing characteristics of two different gel pads (flat vs. horseshoe-shaped) under the head; and determine whether a handheld pressure monitor accurately measures peak interface pressures when compared to full body pressure mapping system. Conceptual Framework: The Braden-Bergstrom conceptual framework for pressure ulcer development was used, with a focus on pressure. Subjects: Subjects were 39 hospitalized children, aged 1-month to 17 years. Methods: Total body pressure mapping was conducted (using the Xsensor Pressure Mapping System) with subjects in supine position on a standard crib or mattress. Pressure mapping of the occiput area was completed under each of three conditions: standard mattress or crib, flat gel pad, and horseshoe-shaped gel pad. Pressure mapping images were analyzed for peak pressure, average pressure, and contact area under all bony prominences, under each of the three conditions. Using a TherapointTM handheld monitor, peak pressure measurements were repeated under bony prominences in a subset of 30 subjects lying supine on a standard crib or mattress. Results: Infants and toddlers tended to load most heavily on occipital areas. As children age, a greater proportion pressure is distributed over buttocks and heels, yet occipital pressure may remain sufficiently high to warrant concern. Using paired t-tests, the flat gel condition showed significantly lower peak pressures (t=3.441, p=.001), average pressures (t=4.475, p&lt;.000), and significantly greater contact area (t=-2.290, p=.028) than control condition. Peak pressures were significantly lower for the flat vs. horseshoe shaped gel (t=-2.928, p=.006). There was a statistically significant correlation between handheld device and Xsensor peak pressures for left heel (r=.759, p=.000) and right heel (r=.618, p=.000). Conclusions: Pressure loading patterns vary as children age. The flat gel provided greater reduction of peak pressure than horseshoe gel. Further work is required to improve the accuracy of the handheld monitor. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.