2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159459
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Comportment through Nursing Experience
Abstract:
Developing Comportment through Nursing Experience
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Dunn, Karen, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 402 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Co-Authors:Cecilia L. Otten, BSN, RN, Master's student; Elizabeth A. Stephens, BSN, RN, Master's student
Death is inevitable for all living beings, and as health care providers, nurses play a principle role in the care of dying individuals and their families. Consequently, the care nurses provide to terminal or dying patients may be affected by their attitudes toward death. Thus, the purpose of this descriptive, correlational pilot study was to examine relationships between demographic variables, nurses’ attitudes toward death, and nurses’ attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Concepts from Benners’ “Novice to Expert” were used to operationalize the research variables and develop the research questions in this study. Fifty-eight registered nurses (oncology and medical/surgical) from two Detroit Metropolitan hospitals were asked to complete a survey of three measurement tools: a demographic tool, Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) and Death Attitudes Profile-Revised (DAP-R). Majority of the sample was female, White, with a mean age of approximately 41 years. Most demonstrated a positive attitude toward caring for dying patients. Nurses that reported spending a higher percentage of time in contact with terminally ill or dying patients reported more positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients. No significant relationship was found between the nurses’ attitudes toward death and the nurses’ attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Statistically significant relationships, however, were found between certain demographic variables, DAP-R subscales and FATCOD. These findings suggest that regardless of how these nurses felt about death, providing professional and quality care to dying patients and their families was salient. Nursing implications included developing continuing education programs that teach effective coping strategies that aim to prevent death anxiety, and identifying barriers that can make caring for dying patients difficult.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Comportment through Nursing Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159459-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing Comportment through Nursing Experience </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dunn, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 402 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cecilia L. Otten, BSN, RN, Master's student; Elizabeth A. Stephens, BSN, RN, Master's student </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Death is inevitable for all living beings, and as health care providers, nurses play a principle role in the care of dying individuals and their families. Consequently, the care nurses provide to terminal or dying patients may be affected by their attitudes toward death. Thus, the purpose of this descriptive, correlational pilot study was to examine relationships between demographic variables, nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward death, and nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Concepts from Benners&rsquo; &ldquo;Novice to Expert&rdquo; were used to operationalize the research variables and develop the research questions in this study. Fifty-eight registered nurses (oncology and medical/surgical) from two Detroit Metropolitan hospitals were asked to complete a survey of three measurement tools: a demographic tool, Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) and Death Attitudes Profile-Revised (DAP-R). Majority of the sample was female, White, with a mean age of approximately 41 years. Most demonstrated a positive attitude toward caring for dying patients. Nurses that reported spending a higher percentage of time in contact with terminally ill or dying patients reported more positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients. No significant relationship was found between the nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward death and the nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Statistically significant relationships, however, were found between certain demographic variables, DAP-R subscales and FATCOD. These findings suggest that regardless of how these nurses felt about death, providing professional and quality care to dying patients and their families was salient. Nursing implications included developing continuing education programs that teach effective coping strategies that aim to prevent death anxiety, and identifying barriers that can make caring for dying patients difficult.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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