2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159461
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Activity Behavior Of American Indian WIC Mothers
Abstract:
Physical Activity Behavior Of American Indian WIC Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA
Co-Authors:Patti Shangreaux
Sedentary lifestyle is a known risk factor for diseases like type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, which are disproportionately prevalent among American Indians. Low-income American Indian mothers represent an important population at-risk for sedentary living. This descriptive-correlational study examined the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change in relationship to the physical activity behavior of low-income American Indian mothers with children enrolled in a Women, Infants and Children program located on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. A purposive sample (N=30) of six American Indian mothers at each of the five stages of readiness for behavior change was used. Relationships between stage of behavior change (measured by the Stage of Exercise Adoption tool) and other TTM constructs were examined. The constructs and corresponding instruments included: physical activity behavior (Seven Day Physical Activity Recall), pros, cons, decisional balance (Pros and Cons to Exercise tool and two open-ended questions), self-efficacy (Self-efficacy for Exercise scale) and processes of behavior change (Processes of Exercise Adoption tool). Significant relationships were found between stage of behavior change and two physical activity energy expenditure indices (r=0.69-0.71, p<0.01), daily minutes of moderate-very hard physical activity (r=0.74, p<0.01), pros (r=0.62, p<0.01), cons (r=-0.58, p<0.05), decisional balance (r=0.59, p<0.01) and self-efficacy (r=0.60, p<0.01). Use of the 10 processes of change differed by stage of change. Self-reported pros and cons to physical activity were different than our previous work with primarily Caucasian WIC mothers. Pros included living long enough to become an elder in the community, role modeling for children, and improved affect. Cons were primarily related to safe environments and presence of children. Results support the TTM as relevant American Indian WIC mothers and provide direction for a future intervention to increase physical activity in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Activity Behavior Of American Indian WIC Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159461-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Activity Behavior Of American Indian WIC Mothers </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fahrenwald, Nancy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patti Shangreaux </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sedentary lifestyle is a known risk factor for diseases like type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, which are disproportionately prevalent among American Indians. Low-income American Indian mothers represent an important population at-risk for sedentary living. This descriptive-correlational study examined the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change in relationship to the physical activity behavior of low-income American Indian mothers with children enrolled in a Women, Infants and Children program located on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. A purposive sample (N=30) of six American Indian mothers at each of the five stages of readiness for behavior change was used. Relationships between stage of behavior change (measured by the Stage of Exercise Adoption tool) and other TTM constructs were examined. The constructs and corresponding instruments included: physical activity behavior (Seven Day Physical Activity Recall), pros, cons, decisional balance (Pros and Cons to Exercise tool and two open-ended questions), self-efficacy (Self-efficacy for Exercise scale) and processes of behavior change (Processes of Exercise Adoption tool). Significant relationships were found between stage of behavior change and two physical activity energy expenditure indices (r=0.69-0.71, p&lt;0.01), daily minutes of moderate-very hard physical activity (r=0.74, p&lt;0.01), pros (r=0.62, p&lt;0.01), cons (r=-0.58, p&lt;0.05), decisional balance (r=0.59, p&lt;0.01) and self-efficacy (r=0.60, p&lt;0.01). Use of the 10 processes of change differed by stage of change. Self-reported pros and cons to physical activity were different than our previous work with primarily Caucasian WIC mothers. Pros included living long enough to become an elder in the community, role modeling for children, and improved affect. Cons were primarily related to safe environments and presence of children. Results support the TTM as relevant American Indian WIC mothers and provide direction for a future intervention to increase physical activity in this population. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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