Housed versus unhoused pregnant adolescents: The role of social support, access to medical care and abuse status in infant outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159462
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Housed versus unhoused pregnant adolescents: The role of social support, access to medical care and abuse status in infant outcomes
Abstract:
Housed versus unhoused pregnant adolescents: The role of social support, access to medical care and abuse status in infant outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Farrar, Margaret, BSN, RN
Contact Address:CON, Mary Gladwin Hall 201X, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
The purpose of this research is to discuss the relationship among consistent housing, social support, utilization of health care services, abuse status, self-care agency and practice and infant outcomes in housed and unhoused pregnant adolescents. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Orem’s Self-care Deficit Theory of Nursing (1995) is the framework used for this research. The framework serves to investigate the relationship between basic conditioning factors of consistent housing and social support, abuse, self-care agency, and the self-care practice of utilization of health care, and the health outcome of infant birth weight. Subjects: In this current study, 140 data sets were analyzed. In the initial study, 152 teens, between the ages of 18 and 20 years, were interviewed as part of a prospective study comparing physical abuse during pregnancy with pregnancy outcomes. Methodology: Teens were interviewed during a prenatal appointment at urban clinics associated with a Level III Perinatal Unit. Instruments used in the initial study included the Abuse Assessment Screen (Parker & McFarlane, 1991), Danger Assessment Screen (Campbell, 1986), Social Support Interview (Giblin, Poland, & Sachs, 1987), and Self-Care Agency and Practice Instruments (Denyes, 1981 & Jesek-Hale, 1995). Results: Both Chi squared and two-tailed t-tests will be used to explore the differences between housed and unhoused teens comparing and contrasting the opinions from different age, economic, racial, and ethnic groups. Implications: The most rapidly increasing rates of homelessness are for mothers/children and unattended minors representing 44% of the American homeless population. A third of all teen parents are homeless at some point during their pregnancy. The identification of at risk teenagers is necessary to enhance access and utilization of prenatal care so that their infants will have healthier outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHoused versus unhoused pregnant adolescents: The role of social support, access to medical care and abuse status in infant outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159462-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Housed versus unhoused pregnant adolescents: The role of social support, access to medical care and abuse status in infant outcomes </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Farrar, Margaret, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Mary Gladwin Hall 201X, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research is to discuss the relationship among consistent housing, social support, utilization of health care services, abuse status, self-care agency and practice and infant outcomes in housed and unhoused pregnant adolescents. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Orem&rsquo;s Self-care Deficit Theory of Nursing (1995) is the framework used for this research. The framework serves to investigate the relationship between basic conditioning factors of consistent housing and social support, abuse, self-care agency, and the self-care practice of utilization of health care, and the health outcome of infant birth weight. Subjects: In this current study, 140 data sets were analyzed. In the initial study, 152 teens, between the ages of 18 and 20 years, were interviewed as part of a prospective study comparing physical abuse during pregnancy with pregnancy outcomes. Methodology: Teens were interviewed during a prenatal appointment at urban clinics associated with a Level III Perinatal Unit. Instruments used in the initial study included the Abuse Assessment Screen (Parker &amp; McFarlane, 1991), Danger Assessment Screen (Campbell, 1986), Social Support Interview (Giblin, Poland, &amp; Sachs, 1987), and Self-Care Agency and Practice Instruments (Denyes, 1981 &amp; Jesek-Hale, 1995). Results: Both Chi squared and two-tailed t-tests will be used to explore the differences between housed and unhoused teens comparing and contrasting the opinions from different age, economic, racial, and ethnic groups. Implications: The most rapidly increasing rates of homelessness are for mothers/children and unattended minors representing 44% of the American homeless population. A third of all teen parents are homeless at some point during their pregnancy. The identification of at risk teenagers is necessary to enhance access and utilization of prenatal care so that their infants will have healthier outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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