2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159465
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Profiles of self-rated health in midlife adults with chronic illnesses
Abstract:
Profiles of self-rated health in midlife adults with chronic illnesses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Finnegan, Lorna, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 3700 W. 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA
Co-Authors:Lucy Marion, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Cheryl Cox, PhD, RN, Associate Faculty Member
Self-rated health (SRH) is an important population health outcome. While it is clear that multiple variables influence SRH, little is known about the distribution of SRH and related subgroup characteristics in midlife adults with chronic illnesses. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to uncover classes of chronically ill midlife adults who share unique profiles of characteristics that predict SRH, and 2) to reveal the predictive factors of SRH for each class. Theoretical/conceptual framework: Selected components of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (IMCHB) guided the inclusion of variables derived from the literature that would likely predict SRH. Self-rated health served as a measure of cognitive appraisal, a key dynamic variable within the IMCHB. Subjects and Methods: Using five waves of data from a large, national longitudinal survey (Health and Retirement Study), the sample included 6335 respondents born between 1931 and 1941, who reported at least one chronic illness. Latent class regression was employed to simultaneously classify respondents and identify factors, which predicted SRH for each class. Results: The final model reflected three distinct profiles of SRH: Positive Health, Average Health, and Negative Health. Five predictors (comorbidity, lack of vigorous physical activity, current smoking, and middle net worth) had the same influence on all three classes. Seven predictors differed significantly across the three classes: overweight, work limitation, depressed mood, not living with a partner, net worth (1st and 4th quintiles), and time since baseline interview. Conclusions: A broad health behavior model and an innovative analytic model were useful tools to unravel the complexity of a simple, one-item measure of SRH. The differential patterns of class-dependent predictors may be used to develop targeted interventions, which are matched to subgroup characteristics. Generic interventions, based on the class-independent predictors, may also improve SRH.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfiles of self-rated health in midlife adults with chronic illnessesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159465-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Profiles of self-rated health in midlife adults with chronic illnesses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Finnegan, Lorna, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3700 W. 103rd Street, Chicago, IL, 60655, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lucy Marion, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Cheryl Cox, PhD, RN, Associate Faculty Member </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Self-rated health (SRH) is an important population health outcome. While it is clear that multiple variables influence SRH, little is known about the distribution of SRH and related subgroup characteristics in midlife adults with chronic illnesses. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to uncover classes of chronically ill midlife adults who share unique profiles of characteristics that predict SRH, and 2) to reveal the predictive factors of SRH for each class. Theoretical/conceptual framework: Selected components of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (IMCHB) guided the inclusion of variables derived from the literature that would likely predict SRH. Self-rated health served as a measure of cognitive appraisal, a key dynamic variable within the IMCHB. Subjects and Methods: Using five waves of data from a large, national longitudinal survey (Health and Retirement Study), the sample included 6335 respondents born between 1931 and 1941, who reported at least one chronic illness. Latent class regression was employed to simultaneously classify respondents and identify factors, which predicted SRH for each class. Results: The final model reflected three distinct profiles of SRH: Positive Health, Average Health, and Negative Health. Five predictors (comorbidity, lack of vigorous physical activity, current smoking, and middle net worth) had the same influence on all three classes. Seven predictors differed significantly across the three classes: overweight, work limitation, depressed mood, not living with a partner, net worth (1st and 4th quintiles), and time since baseline interview. Conclusions: A broad health behavior model and an innovative analytic model were useful tools to unravel the complexity of a simple, one-item measure of SRH. The differential patterns of class-dependent predictors may be used to develop targeted interventions, which are matched to subgroup characteristics. Generic interventions, based on the class-independent predictors, may also improve SRH. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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