2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159466
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Changes in Sleep Beliefs and Practices following CABG Surgery
Abstract:
Changes in Sleep Beliefs and Practices following CABG Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Floyd, Judith, PhD, RN
Title:Professor
Contact Address:CON, 5557 Cass Ave., 319 Cohn Bldg., Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Wendy S. Shreve, MSN, Program Manager for Nursing Research; Stephen Marshall Medler, PhD, Assistant Professor; Francis Wimbush, PhD, RN, Adjunct Professor
The purpose of this study was to explore whether specific sleep beliefs and sleep promotion practices change during stressful life events. The conceptual framework guiding the investigation was Bearpark’s (1994) model describing the development of chronic insomnia. A central component of the model is the role “fear of not sleeping” plays. Our assumption is that fear results from adults’ beliefs about sleep. Our working hypothesis is that chronic insomnia develops when beliefs lead to sleep hygiene practices that are maladaptive. Methods: Elective CABG patients (N=25) completed questionnaires related to their sleep beliefs and sleep promotion practices pre-operatively and at 6-weeks post-operatively. Five sleep belief factors were measured by the Sleep Belief Scale (SBS)_Short Form designed for use with clinical populations. The Sleep Hygiene Awareness and Practices Scale (SHAPS) was used to measure sleep promotion practices. Multivariate analyses were used to examine relationships among variables pre and post-operatively. Two-tailed alpha was set at .05. Results: The subjects were predominantly Caucasian men ages 47-82 (M=64.5, SD=10.09). Few positive sleep hygiene practices were used more than 3 times/week. Their use did not increase significantly pre- to post-operatively. Subjects reported holding sleep beliefs more strongly following surgery. Pre-operative beliefs were related to both negative and positive sleep hygiene practices. Conclusions: Overall, subjects used few of the sleep hygiene practices known to promote sleep. Although some practices adopted by this sample were positive, others, such as worrying about their ability to sleep and doing strenuous exercise close to bedtime are considered counterproductive. There was support for the premise that adults’ sleep beliefs strengthen during stressful life events and that beliefs about sleep are related to sleep promotion practices. Because nurses work with patients during periods of stress, findings about how patients attempt to cope with poor sleep at such times has direct applicability once replicated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChanges in Sleep Beliefs and Practices following CABG Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159466-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Changes in Sleep Beliefs and Practices following CABG Surgery </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Floyd, Judith, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 5557 Cass Ave., 319 Cohn Bldg., Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wendy S. Shreve, MSN, Program Manager for Nursing Research; Stephen Marshall Medler, PhD, Assistant Professor; Francis Wimbush, PhD, RN, Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore whether specific sleep beliefs and sleep promotion practices change during stressful life events. The conceptual framework guiding the investigation was Bearpark&rsquo;s (1994) model describing the development of chronic insomnia. A central component of the model is the role &ldquo;fear of not sleeping&rdquo; plays. Our assumption is that fear results from adults&rsquo; beliefs about sleep. Our working hypothesis is that chronic insomnia develops when beliefs lead to sleep hygiene practices that are maladaptive. Methods: Elective CABG patients (N=25) completed questionnaires related to their sleep beliefs and sleep promotion practices pre-operatively and at 6-weeks post-operatively. Five sleep belief factors were measured by the Sleep Belief Scale (SBS)_Short Form designed for use with clinical populations. The Sleep Hygiene Awareness and Practices Scale (SHAPS) was used to measure sleep promotion practices. Multivariate analyses were used to examine relationships among variables pre and post-operatively. Two-tailed alpha was set at .05. Results: The subjects were predominantly Caucasian men ages 47-82 (M=64.5, SD=10.09). Few positive sleep hygiene practices were used more than 3 times/week. Their use did not increase significantly pre- to post-operatively. Subjects reported holding sleep beliefs more strongly following surgery. Pre-operative beliefs were related to both negative and positive sleep hygiene practices. Conclusions: Overall, subjects used few of the sleep hygiene practices known to promote sleep. Although some practices adopted by this sample were positive, others, such as worrying about their ability to sleep and doing strenuous exercise close to bedtime are considered counterproductive. There was support for the premise that adults&rsquo; sleep beliefs strengthen during stressful life events and that beliefs about sleep are related to sleep promotion practices. Because nurses work with patients during periods of stress, findings about how patients attempt to cope with poor sleep at such times has direct applicability once replicated. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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