2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159468
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Terminally Ill Patients and Their Caregivers' Quality of Life
Abstract:
Terminally Ill Patients and Their Caregivers' Quality of Life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Woung-Ru, Tang
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Gung University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, 333, ROC
Contact Telephone:886.3.3283016
To better understand quality of life (QOL) and its important correlates, a cross-sectional correlational design was used to study the important correlates and QOL of terminally ill patients and their caregivers based on Stewart et al.'s (1999) conceptual model of factors affecting quality and length of life of dying patients and their families. Fifty-nine pairs of subjects, as well as one unmatched terminally ill patient and one unmatched caregiver (N=120), were recruited from two local hospice programs in the Midwestern region of the United States. Data were collected through interviews at subjects' homes. Terminally ill patients and their caregivers had an above average QOL in this study. For terminally ill patients, living with the caregiver, spirituality, pain intensity, physical performance status, and social support as a set explained 38% of the variance in their QOL. Terminally ill patients who did not live with their caregivers, experienced less pain intensity in the past 24 hours, reported higher spirituality, and had more social support, also had a significantly better QOL. Among these 5 predictors, living with the caregiver, spirituality, and social support statistically were significant predictors of terminally ill patients' QOL. For caregivers, educational status, living with the terminally ill patient, physical health status, spirituality, and social support as a set explained 44% of the variance in their QOL. Caregivers who had higher education, better physical health status, greater spirituality, more social support, had a significantly better QOL. In part due to problems of collinearity, only physical health status and spirituality were statistically significant predictors of caregivers' QOL. What factors sustain or promote QOL over time need to be explored. More importantly, how the structure and process of health care services impede or facilitate QOL needs to be investigated in order to improve end-of-life care in the United States.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTerminally Ill Patients and Their Caregivers' Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159468-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Terminally Ill Patients and Their Caregivers' Quality of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woung-Ru, Tang</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Gung University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, 333, ROC</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">886.3.3283016</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To better understand quality of life (QOL) and its important correlates, a cross-sectional correlational design was used to study the important correlates and QOL of terminally ill patients and their caregivers based on Stewart et al.'s (1999) conceptual model of factors affecting quality and length of life of dying patients and their families. Fifty-nine pairs of subjects, as well as one unmatched terminally ill patient and one unmatched caregiver (N=120), were recruited from two local hospice programs in the Midwestern region of the United States. Data were collected through interviews at subjects' homes. Terminally ill patients and their caregivers had an above average QOL in this study. For terminally ill patients, living with the caregiver, spirituality, pain intensity, physical performance status, and social support as a set explained 38% of the variance in their QOL. Terminally ill patients who did not live with their caregivers, experienced less pain intensity in the past 24 hours, reported higher spirituality, and had more social support, also had a significantly better QOL. Among these 5 predictors, living with the caregiver, spirituality, and social support statistically were significant predictors of terminally ill patients' QOL. For caregivers, educational status, living with the terminally ill patient, physical health status, spirituality, and social support as a set explained 44% of the variance in their QOL. Caregivers who had higher education, better physical health status, greater spirituality, more social support, had a significantly better QOL. In part due to problems of collinearity, only physical health status and spirituality were statistically significant predictors of caregivers' QOL. What factors sustain or promote QOL over time need to be explored. More importantly, how the structure and process of health care services impede or facilitate QOL needs to be investigated in order to improve end-of-life care in the United States.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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