2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159469
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model Predicting Pain Outcomes with Guided Imagery
Abstract:
A Model Predicting Pain Outcomes with Guided Imagery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Kwekkeboom, Kristine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 314 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Contact Telephone:319.335.7034
Pain is a significant problem experienced by persons hospitalized with cancer. Nonpharmacologic strategies such as guided imagery may be useful adjuncts in enhancing pain relief, however, these strategies are not helpful to all people (Donovan, 1987; Kwekkeboom, Huseby-Moore, & Ward, 1998). This pilot study was conducted to evaluate a model predicting success with guided imagery. The model suggests that pain outcomes achieved with imagery are directly influenced by imaging ability and outcome expectancy; and that history of imagery use, preferred coping style, and perceived credibility of the imagery provider predict outcome expectancy (Kwekkeboom, 1999). A quasi-experimental design was used. Sixty-two hospitalized cancer patients, currently experiencing pain greater than or equal to 3 on a 0-10 scale, completed questionnaires and used an audio taped imagery intervention. Pain outcomes included changes in pain intensity and pain-related distress, affect, perceived control over pain, and evaluation of the imagery experience. Path analysis was conducted to assess relationships proposed in the model. Results indicated that previous history with imagery predicted outcome expectancy (?=.342, p < .01), however credibility of the imagery provider and match with coping style did not. With covariates (baseline pain/distress and symptom experience) in the equation, imaging ability predicted change in pain score from pre- to immediately post-imagery, positive affect, perceived control over pain, and evaluation of the imagery experience (?=.301-.428, p < .05) and demonstrated a trend toward significance in predicting change in pain score from pre- to 5-minutes post-imagery (?=.248, p=.06). Outcome expectancy predicted change in distress score from pre- to during-imagery (?=.230, p < .05). Variance explained in pain outcomes ranged from 10%-48%. Further exploration of model variables is warranted. Findings suggest that it may be useful to consider current symptom experience and also imaging ability in determining whether guided imagery is an appropriate intervention for an individual patient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model Predicting Pain Outcomes with Guided Imageryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159469-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Model Predicting Pain Outcomes with Guided Imagery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kwekkeboom, Kristine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 314 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">319.335.7034</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kristine-kwekkeboom@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is a significant problem experienced by persons hospitalized with cancer. Nonpharmacologic strategies such as guided imagery may be useful adjuncts in enhancing pain relief, however, these strategies are not helpful to all people (Donovan, 1987; Kwekkeboom, Huseby-Moore, &amp; Ward, 1998). This pilot study was conducted to evaluate a model predicting success with guided imagery. The model suggests that pain outcomes achieved with imagery are directly influenced by imaging ability and outcome expectancy; and that history of imagery use, preferred coping style, and perceived credibility of the imagery provider predict outcome expectancy (Kwekkeboom, 1999). A quasi-experimental design was used. Sixty-two hospitalized cancer patients, currently experiencing pain greater than or equal to 3 on a 0-10 scale, completed questionnaires and used an audio taped imagery intervention. Pain outcomes included changes in pain intensity and pain-related distress, affect, perceived control over pain, and evaluation of the imagery experience. Path analysis was conducted to assess relationships proposed in the model. Results indicated that previous history with imagery predicted outcome expectancy (?=.342, p &lt; .01), however credibility of the imagery provider and match with coping style did not. With covariates (baseline pain/distress and symptom experience) in the equation, imaging ability predicted change in pain score from pre- to immediately post-imagery, positive affect, perceived control over pain, and evaluation of the imagery experience (?=.301-.428, p &lt; .05) and demonstrated a trend toward significance in predicting change in pain score from pre- to 5-minutes post-imagery (?=.248, p=.06). Outcome expectancy predicted change in distress score from pre- to during-imagery (?=.230, p &lt; .05). Variance explained in pain outcomes ranged from 10%-48%. Further exploration of model variables is warranted. Findings suggest that it may be useful to consider current symptom experience and also imaging ability in determining whether guided imagery is an appropriate intervention for an individual patient.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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