2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159470
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Imagery to Reduce Children's Postoperative Pain
Abstract:
Imagery to Reduce Children's Postoperative Pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Huth, Myra
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital of Wisconsin
Title:Research Associate
Contact Address:9000 West Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53226, USA
Contact Telephone:414.266.2000
This experimental study investigated the effectiveness of distraction using imagery, in addition to routine analgesics, in reducing tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy pain in 7-12-year old children during ambulatory surgery and at home based on the Neuman Systems (1995) and McCaul/Malott (1984) Models. Children were recruited from five Ambulatory Surgery Centers (ASC) and Short Stay Surgery Units (SSU). Thirty-six children randomly assigned to the experimental group watched a professionally developed videotape on the use of imagery and then listened to a 30-minute audio tape of imagery approximately one week prior to surgery (T1), one to four hours after surgery (T2), and 22-27 hours after discharge from the ASC or SSU (T3). The 37 children in the comparison group received standard care. Pain was measured at each of the time points in both groups. Measures of sensory pain were the Oucher and amount of analgesics used in the ASCU/SSU and home; measures of affective pain were the Facial Affective Scale (FAS) and State Anxiety Inventory for Children (SAIC). MANCOVA, while controlling for trait anxiety and opioid and non-opioid intake 1-4 hours before the pain measures, showed significantly lower pain in the treatment group at T2 but not at T3. A two-way RM MANOVA indicated no significant differences in combined opioid and non-opioid use between the groups, but there was significantly more given atT2 than at T3. Additional analysis revealed 69% of the sample received less than the recommended dose of opioids at T2 and 58% at T3. Also, 78% received less than the recommended dose of acetaminophen and ibuprofen at T2 and 75% at T3. Nurses should use imagery to reduce postoperative pain following tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy in the surgical setting. Teaching parents about adequate home administration of analgesics may be essential for imagery effectiveness in the home.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImagery to Reduce Children's Postoperative Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159470-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Imagery to Reduce Children's Postoperative Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Huth, Myra</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9000 West Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, WI, 53226, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.266.2000</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mmhuth@msn.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This experimental study investigated the effectiveness of distraction using imagery, in addition to routine analgesics, in reducing tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy pain in 7-12-year old children during ambulatory surgery and at home based on the Neuman Systems (1995) and McCaul/Malott (1984) Models. Children were recruited from five Ambulatory Surgery Centers (ASC) and Short Stay Surgery Units (SSU). Thirty-six children randomly assigned to the experimental group watched a professionally developed videotape on the use of imagery and then listened to a 30-minute audio tape of imagery approximately one week prior to surgery (T1), one to four hours after surgery (T2), and 22-27 hours after discharge from the ASC or SSU (T3). The 37 children in the comparison group received standard care. Pain was measured at each of the time points in both groups. Measures of sensory pain were the Oucher and amount of analgesics used in the ASCU/SSU and home; measures of affective pain were the Facial Affective Scale (FAS) and State Anxiety Inventory for Children (SAIC). MANCOVA, while controlling for trait anxiety and opioid and non-opioid intake 1-4 hours before the pain measures, showed significantly lower pain in the treatment group at T2 but not at T3. A two-way RM MANOVA indicated no significant differences in combined opioid and non-opioid use between the groups, but there was significantly more given atT2 than at T3. Additional analysis revealed 69% of the sample received less than the recommended dose of opioids at T2 and 58% at T3. Also, 78% received less than the recommended dose of acetaminophen and ibuprofen at T2 and 75% at T3. Nurses should use imagery to reduce postoperative pain following tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy in the surgical setting. Teaching parents about adequate home administration of analgesics may be essential for imagery effectiveness in the home.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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