2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159471
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of the Children's Health Risk Behavior Scale
Abstract:
Development of the Children's Health Risk Behavior Scale
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Riesch, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5169
Developmental theory and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's conceptualization of health risk behavior provided useful perspectives for development of a reliable measure of later elementary school aged children's involvement in health risk behaviors. Constructing a Children's Health Risk Behavior Scale was part of a research program that seeks to improve parent-child relationships through improving skill in communication. There is evidence that open parent-child communication is a protective factor, buffering or negating children's participation in health risk behavior. Despite extensive research about such behavior among high school students, no instrument exists to assess later elementary school aged children's involvement in health risk behavior. The sample was 29 multi-racial children from the 5th grade of an urban elementary school. The mean age of the children was 10.6 years, 16 were male and 13 were female. The instrument included 21 items to identify a friend's and then the child's own experience with unintentional or intentional injury, tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, sexual activity, and health habits. All data collection procedures occurred in the classroom and were repeated after 1 week. Children had little problem understanding the terms and provided specific suggestions for instrument improvement. The test-retest reliability was .958. The most significant health risks were for unintentional injury, for example, not using seatbelts, riding bikes or scooters without a helmet, swimming without a lifeguard. About half had been in a physical fight and nearly half felt unsafe at school. Most had not tried tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs, or "gone out with" or held hands, put arm around or kissed a girl or boyfriend. Exercise, diet, and sleep habits were within recommended parameters. We conclude the instrument to be a reliable measure of children's health risk behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of the Children's Health Risk Behavior Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159471-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of the Children's Health Risk Behavior Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riesch, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5169</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skriesch@facstaff.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Developmental theory and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's conceptualization of health risk behavior provided useful perspectives for development of a reliable measure of later elementary school aged children's involvement in health risk behaviors. Constructing a Children's Health Risk Behavior Scale was part of a research program that seeks to improve parent-child relationships through improving skill in communication. There is evidence that open parent-child communication is a protective factor, buffering or negating children's participation in health risk behavior. Despite extensive research about such behavior among high school students, no instrument exists to assess later elementary school aged children's involvement in health risk behavior. The sample was 29 multi-racial children from the 5th grade of an urban elementary school. The mean age of the children was 10.6 years, 16 were male and 13 were female. The instrument included 21 items to identify a friend's and then the child's own experience with unintentional or intentional injury, tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, sexual activity, and health habits. All data collection procedures occurred in the classroom and were repeated after 1 week. Children had little problem understanding the terms and provided specific suggestions for instrument improvement. The test-retest reliability was .958. The most significant health risks were for unintentional injury, for example, not using seatbelts, riding bikes or scooters without a helmet, swimming without a lifeguard. About half had been in a physical fight and nearly half felt unsafe at school. Most had not tried tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs, or &quot;gone out with&quot; or held hands, put arm around or kissed a girl or boyfriend. Exercise, diet, and sleep habits were within recommended parameters. We conclude the instrument to be a reliable measure of children's health risk behavior.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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