2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159472
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Behaviors of Nurses Who Immunize Children
Abstract:
Behaviors of Nurses Who Immunize Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Stenvig, Thomas, MPH/MSPH
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 2275A 345, Brookings, SD, 57007-0098, USA
Contact Telephone:605.688.6652
This study examined the behaviors of nurses who immunize children as a factor affecting immunization coverage for prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases. Ajzen's (1985) theory of planned behavior was used to construct an instrument named the Nurses' Childhood Immunization Belief Questionnaire (NCIBQ). A mail survey approach was used to distribute the NCIBQ to 316 randomly selected nurses who immunize children in South Dakota following Dillman's (1978) total design method, yielding 261 completed surveys for an 84% response rate. Multiple regression analysis showed behavioral intention was a significant determinant of behavior (p=.000), perceived behavioral control was positively correlated with behavioral intention (p=.000) and a major predictor of immunizing behavior (p=.001). A positive correlation was found between respondents' immunizing behavior and age (p=.042), education (p <=.001), and professional certification (p < .015). Nurses in public settings were more able to follow accepted vaccine recommendations than those in private settings (p < .01). RNs were also more likely than LPNs to follow recommendations (p=.043), as were nurses with five facilitators to immunization present, including audits, standing orders, the AAP "Red Book", the Standards for pediatric immunization practices, and WIC linkage (p < .05). Respondents identified a variety of interventions to relieve discomfort from vaccine injections. Missed opportunities to immunize were evident in responses to each of four case scenarios. Although nurses with more education were more successful at correctly identifying age-appropriate vaccines (p < .05), inappropriate vaccine choices were common. Findings have several important implications for nursing practice, education, and research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBehaviors of Nurses Who Immunize Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159472-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Behaviors of Nurses Who Immunize Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stenvig, Thomas, MPH/MSPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 2275A 345, Brookings, SD, 57007-0098, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">605.688.6652</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">thomas_stenvig@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined the behaviors of nurses who immunize children as a factor affecting immunization coverage for prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases. Ajzen's (1985) theory of planned behavior was used to construct an instrument named the Nurses' Childhood Immunization Belief Questionnaire (NCIBQ). A mail survey approach was used to distribute the NCIBQ to 316 randomly selected nurses who immunize children in South Dakota following Dillman's (1978) total design method, yielding 261 completed surveys for an 84% response rate. Multiple regression analysis showed behavioral intention was a significant determinant of behavior (p=.000), perceived behavioral control was positively correlated with behavioral intention (p=.000) and a major predictor of immunizing behavior (p=.001). A positive correlation was found between respondents' immunizing behavior and age (p=.042), education (p &lt;=.001), and professional certification (p &lt; .015). Nurses in public settings were more able to follow accepted vaccine recommendations than those in private settings (p &lt; .01). RNs were also more likely than LPNs to follow recommendations (p=.043), as were nurses with five facilitators to immunization present, including audits, standing orders, the AAP &quot;Red Book&quot;, the Standards for pediatric immunization practices, and WIC linkage (p &lt; .05). Respondents identified a variety of interventions to relieve discomfort from vaccine injections. Missed opportunities to immunize were evident in responses to each of four case scenarios. Although nurses with more education were more successful at correctly identifying age-appropriate vaccines (p &lt; .05), inappropriate vaccine choices were common. Findings have several important implications for nursing practice, education, and research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:02:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:02:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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