2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159475
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Influences on Storytelling in a Focused Group Setting
Abstract:
Cultural Influences on Storytelling in a Focused Group Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Banks-Wallace, JoAnne
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, S235 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Objective: To examine how culture influenced storytelling within a focus group study. Method: Narrative analysis of transcripts from a focus group study examining African American women's views regarding the significance of physical activity as a tool for decreasing cardiovascular risks secondary to hypertension. Two focus groups comprised of twenty-six women, ranging in age from 23 to 72 years old were conducted. Results: Cultural norms influenced group dynamics and the stories shared in the study. Norms related to being "A good Christian woman" and "A strong Black woman" were particularly significant in shaping women's stories. There were discrepancies between the stories that women shared on tape and stories told while they shared a meal together at the conclusion of the second formal session. The latter storytelling was instigated by a group participant who challenged the truthfulness of some women's responses. Discrepancies were most apparent in discussions about composition of physical activity intervention groups. A survey completed by participants prior to the second focus group corresponded directly to thoughts expressed during informal storytelling. Conclusions: This study affirmed an essential principle of the oral tradition, cultural norms have a significant impact on story development and sharing. A clear understanding of group norms is therefore critical to the appropriate interpretation of data. The use of surveys prior to discussion may assist participants in sharing information that conflicts with cultural norms. Combining written responses with information gleaned through formal and informal storytelling may result in a fuller understanding of the phenomena of interest.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Influences on Storytelling in a Focused Group Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159475-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Influences on Storytelling in a Focused Group Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Banks-Wallace, JoAnne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, S235 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To examine how culture influenced storytelling within a focus group study. Method: Narrative analysis of transcripts from a focus group study examining African American women's views regarding the significance of physical activity as a tool for decreasing cardiovascular risks secondary to hypertension. Two focus groups comprised of twenty-six women, ranging in age from 23 to 72 years old were conducted. Results: Cultural norms influenced group dynamics and the stories shared in the study. Norms related to being &quot;A good Christian woman&quot; and &quot;A strong Black woman&quot; were particularly significant in shaping women's stories. There were discrepancies between the stories that women shared on tape and stories told while they shared a meal together at the conclusion of the second formal session. The latter storytelling was instigated by a group participant who challenged the truthfulness of some women's responses. Discrepancies were most apparent in discussions about composition of physical activity intervention groups. A survey completed by participants prior to the second focus group corresponded directly to thoughts expressed during informal storytelling. Conclusions: This study affirmed an essential principle of the oral tradition, cultural norms have a significant impact on story development and sharing. A clear understanding of group norms is therefore critical to the appropriate interpretation of data. The use of surveys prior to discussion may assist participants in sharing information that conflicts with cultural norms. Combining written responses with information gleaned through formal and informal storytelling may result in a fuller understanding of the phenomena of interest.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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