2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159477
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Continued Development of a Discharge Planning High Risk Screen
Abstract:
Continued Development of a Discharge Planning High Risk Screen
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Holland, Diane
P.I. Institution Name:Mayo Clinic
Contact Address:200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA
Contact Telephone:507.284.2511
Discharge planning remains a critically influential aspect of hospital care. Poor discharge decisions can be catastrophic for patients, their families, and health care systems. While most discharge plans are routine, a patient subgroup exists that requires non-routine discharge planning resources. Identification of patients who will use additional resources remains elusive, limiting the effectiveness of hospital discharge planning. The purpose of this study was to identify variables available early in the hospital stay that predict the use of non-routine discharge planning resources. A retrospective design was used, referencing a systematic sample from a previous study of 991 adults hospitalized in a Midwest tertiary center May 1998 through September 1998. A decentralized discharge planning model was in place, with staff nurses, CNS's, and physicians on the unit responsible for routine discharge plans. Additional hospital personnel were available for non-routine plans. Medical records were reviewed from the date of admission until discharge. The outcome variables were use of any non-routine hospital discharge planning resource and discharge disposition. Backward stepwise regression and areas under ROCs were used in the analysis. Five variables available on admission (age, Rankin score, prior living status, self-reported mobility limitation, and co-morbidities) predicted the use of non-routine discharge planning resources (R2=.31, AUC=.833). The same five variables predicted discharge disposition (R2=.41, AUC=.877). Development of a practical and accurate screen to identify patients who would benefit from targeted and enhanced interventions will improve hospital discharge planning decision making. Future research will investigate prospective testing of the model in specific clinical populations, other health systems, and other models of discharge planning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContinued Development of a Discharge Planning High Risk Screenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159477-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Continued Development of a Discharge Planning High Risk Screen</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holland, Diane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mayo Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507.284.2511</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">holland.diane@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Discharge planning remains a critically influential aspect of hospital care. Poor discharge decisions can be catastrophic for patients, their families, and health care systems. While most discharge plans are routine, a patient subgroup exists that requires non-routine discharge planning resources. Identification of patients who will use additional resources remains elusive, limiting the effectiveness of hospital discharge planning. The purpose of this study was to identify variables available early in the hospital stay that predict the use of non-routine discharge planning resources. A retrospective design was used, referencing a systematic sample from a previous study of 991 adults hospitalized in a Midwest tertiary center May 1998 through September 1998. A decentralized discharge planning model was in place, with staff nurses, CNS's, and physicians on the unit responsible for routine discharge plans. Additional hospital personnel were available for non-routine plans. Medical records were reviewed from the date of admission until discharge. The outcome variables were use of any non-routine hospital discharge planning resource and discharge disposition. Backward stepwise regression and areas under ROCs were used in the analysis. Five variables available on admission (age, Rankin score, prior living status, self-reported mobility limitation, and co-morbidities) predicted the use of non-routine discharge planning resources (R2=.31, AUC=.833). The same five variables predicted discharge disposition (R2=.41, AUC=.877). Development of a practical and accurate screen to identify patients who would benefit from targeted and enhanced interventions will improve hospital discharge planning decision making. Future research will investigate prospective testing of the model in specific clinical populations, other health systems, and other models of discharge planning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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