Children with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making regarding Phase I Clinical Trials

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159480
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making regarding Phase I Clinical Trials
Abstract:
Children with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making regarding Phase I Clinical Trials
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Angst, Denise
P.I. Institution Name:Lutheran General Children's Hospital
Title:Director
Contact Address:Pediatric Research, 1675 Dempster Street, Park Ridge, IL, 60068, USA
Participation of children in research raises complex social, psychological, physical, ethical, and regulatory concerns for them and their families. This is especially true of children's participation in Phase I clinical trials, with subjects who may not be able to consent or assent for their own participation. While we do have some knowledge related to how individuals in the family define, manage, and evaluate children's participation in research, we know little about family decision making regarding children's participation in Phase I clinical trials. Data from 2 descriptive studies regarding decision making in pediatric oncology were analyzed using qualitative, secondary analysis techniques in order to describe how parent's view of their children's participation in Phase I oncology clinical trials. Family management styles conceptual framework (defining, managing, and consequence themes) was used as an organizing framework for the analysis. Parents defined or viewed their situation in relationship to their choices and expectations, health care provider expectations, children's illness situation, and family and personal situations. These findings have implications for the conduct of clinical trials in children and for future research in this area.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making regarding Phase I Clinical Trialsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159480-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Children with Childhood Cancer and Family Decision Making regarding Phase I Clinical Trials</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Angst, Denise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lutheran General Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Pediatric Research, 1675 Dempster Street, Park Ridge, IL, 60068, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Participation of children in research raises complex social, psychological, physical, ethical, and regulatory concerns for them and their families. This is especially true of children's participation in Phase I clinical trials, with subjects who may not be able to consent or assent for their own participation. While we do have some knowledge related to how individuals in the family define, manage, and evaluate children's participation in research, we know little about family decision making regarding children's participation in Phase I clinical trials. Data from 2 descriptive studies regarding decision making in pediatric oncology were analyzed using qualitative, secondary analysis techniques in order to describe how parent's view of their children's participation in Phase I oncology clinical trials. Family management styles conceptual framework (defining, managing, and consequence themes) was used as an organizing framework for the analysis. Parents defined or viewed their situation in relationship to their choices and expectations, health care provider expectations, children's illness situation, and family and personal situations. These findings have implications for the conduct of clinical trials in children and for future research in this area.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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