Family Caregivers of Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: Family Stressors, Resources, and Needs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159481
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Caregivers of Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: Family Stressors, Resources, and Needs
Abstract:
Family Caregivers of Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: Family Stressors, Resources, and Needs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Williams, Margaret
P.I. Institution Name:Quincy University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing, PO Box 7005, 11th & Oak, Quincy, IL, 62305-7005, USA
Purpose: To examine the perceptions that family caregivers of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have regarding their children's needs, family stressors, resources, functioning, and needs. Theoretical Framework: Constructs from the Resiliency Model were used to conduct the analysis. Sample: Thirty-three family caregivers of children with TBI who resided in Illinois, and completed the 1998 Needs Assessment Survey for the Illinois Traumatic Brain Injury Planning Project. Method: Using a qualitative descriptive design, a content analysis was performed of survey comments from family caregivers. Results: Age group differences existed between family constructs. The family caregivers comments described diverse family stressors (over 16 categories) during the long-term recovery phase after a brain injury. Caregivers of adolescents made the majority of the overall comments regarding family stressors. Financial stressors were commented on the most frequently and by all three age groups. There were four broad categories of family needs: Financial needs (5 items), educational needs (6 items), support needs (2 items), and service needs (13 items). Service needs were mentioned the most and differed based on the child's age. Overall, the most comments referred to family needs and family needs were similar to the needs of the child with TBI. Family resources were minimally commented on, however family caregivers' comments revealed that professional services were a major beneficial resource for their child with TBI. Resource related comments addressed resources such as knowledge/access of resources, insurance and changes in resource eligibility due to age. Conclusions: There were strong interrelationships between developmental influences and TBI related influences upon family stressors, family resources, family needs and family functioning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Caregivers of Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: Family Stressors, Resources, and Needsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159481-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Caregivers of Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: Family Stressors, Resources, and Needs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Margaret</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Quincy University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing, PO Box 7005, 11th &amp; Oak, Quincy, IL, 62305-7005, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To examine the perceptions that family caregivers of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have regarding their children's needs, family stressors, resources, functioning, and needs. Theoretical Framework: Constructs from the Resiliency Model were used to conduct the analysis. Sample: Thirty-three family caregivers of children with TBI who resided in Illinois, and completed the 1998 Needs Assessment Survey for the Illinois Traumatic Brain Injury Planning Project. Method: Using a qualitative descriptive design, a content analysis was performed of survey comments from family caregivers. Results: Age group differences existed between family constructs. The family caregivers comments described diverse family stressors (over 16 categories) during the long-term recovery phase after a brain injury. Caregivers of adolescents made the majority of the overall comments regarding family stressors. Financial stressors were commented on the most frequently and by all three age groups. There were four broad categories of family needs: Financial needs (5 items), educational needs (6 items), support needs (2 items), and service needs (13 items). Service needs were mentioned the most and differed based on the child's age. Overall, the most comments referred to family needs and family needs were similar to the needs of the child with TBI. Family resources were minimally commented on, however family caregivers' comments revealed that professional services were a major beneficial resource for their child with TBI. Resource related comments addressed resources such as knowledge/access of resources, insurance and changes in resource eligibility due to age. Conclusions: There were strong interrelationships between developmental influences and TBI related influences upon family stressors, family resources, family needs and family functioning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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