2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159482
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women and Caregiving: Coping, Support and Depression
Abstract:
Women and Caregiving: Coping, Support and Depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Musil, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.8775
Although empirical evidence indicates that coping and support affect the well-being of caregivers, few studies have examined differences in coping across types of caregivers, or how specific coping strategies affect the well-being of caregivers, based on type of caregiving. This secondary analysis used a stress and coping framework to examine these issues using pooled, cross-sectional data from 384 women who participated in either of two studies: a study of caregivers of older adults(n=101)or a study of grandmothers by caregiver status (86 grandmothers raising grandchildren, 85 grandmothers living in multigenerational homes, and 112 non-caregivers). Coping and support differed by caregiver status. Caregivers of elders and grandmothers raising grandchildren used more active coping strategies, and non-caregivers used fewer avoidant/minimizing strategies than the grandmothers. When examining the effects of specific coping strategies and support on CES-D rated depression, 22-46% of depression in each caregiver group was explained. For women in all groups, avoidant coping and less support contributed to more depressive symptoms. Implications about coping, depression and the context of women's caregiving are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen and Caregiving: Coping, Support and Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159482-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women and Caregiving: Coping, Support and Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Musil, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.8775</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmm4@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although empirical evidence indicates that coping and support affect the well-being of caregivers, few studies have examined differences in coping across types of caregivers, or how specific coping strategies affect the well-being of caregivers, based on type of caregiving. This secondary analysis used a stress and coping framework to examine these issues using pooled, cross-sectional data from 384 women who participated in either of two studies: a study of caregivers of older adults(n=101)or a study of grandmothers by caregiver status (86 grandmothers raising grandchildren, 85 grandmothers living in multigenerational homes, and 112 non-caregivers). Coping and support differed by caregiver status. Caregivers of elders and grandmothers raising grandchildren used more active coping strategies, and non-caregivers used fewer avoidant/minimizing strategies than the grandmothers. When examining the effects of specific coping strategies and support on CES-D rated depression, 22-46% of depression in each caregiver group was explained. For women in all groups, avoidant coping and less support contributed to more depressive symptoms. Implications about coping, depression and the context of women's caregiving are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.