2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159486
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of African American Women with Crack Cocaine Addiction
Abstract:
The Experience of African American Women with Crack Cocaine Addiction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Anderson, Judith, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA
Contact Telephone:4193835893
The purpose of this psychophenomenological study was to explore the experience of African American women with crack cocaine addiction. This paper focuses on the participants' experiences during their early life and while they were actively using. The purposive sample included five African American women(ages 27 to 44 years)in recovery for at least six months from cocaine addiction and former residents of one transitional recovery program. Interview data were analyzed by van Kaam's revised psychophenomenological method. Following analysis, findings were interpreted within Orem's self-care deficit theory of nursing. Eight essential elements were described by the participants in discussing their early life experiences. An additional six essential elements were described as the participants recalled their self-care practices while using. The relevance of these elements to understanding the African American woman's experience in crack cocaine addiction is discussed. Implications for nurses working with young children and adolescents as well as those working with addicted women are discussed and specific nursing interventions are suggested. The profile of an African American girl at risk for cocaine addiction is presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of African American Women with Crack Cocaine Addictionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159486-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Experience of African American Women with Crack Cocaine Addiction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Judith, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">4193835893</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janderson@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this psychophenomenological study was to explore the experience of African American women with crack cocaine addiction. This paper focuses on the participants' experiences during their early life and while they were actively using. The purposive sample included five African American women(ages 27 to 44 years)in recovery for at least six months from cocaine addiction and former residents of one transitional recovery program. Interview data were analyzed by van Kaam's revised psychophenomenological method. Following analysis, findings were interpreted within Orem's self-care deficit theory of nursing. Eight essential elements were described by the participants in discussing their early life experiences. An additional six essential elements were described as the participants recalled their self-care practices while using. The relevance of these elements to understanding the African American woman's experience in crack cocaine addiction is discussed. Implications for nurses working with young children and adolescents as well as those working with addicted women are discussed and specific nursing interventions are suggested. The profile of an African American girl at risk for cocaine addiction is presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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