2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159487
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Resilience in Rural Adolescents
Abstract:
Psychosocial Resilience in Rural Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Tusaie-Mumford, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Advance Practice Nurse
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 206G, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.7561
All over the world, adolescents are going to school, learning and making friends without developing depression or substance abuse. Many of these adolescents navigate the effects of poverty, violence, or seriously ill parents. We have much to learn from these resilient adolescents. Psychosocial resilience is the combination of characteristics that allows at-risk individuals to successfully cope and function above the norm. Understanding the interactive processes present in psychosocial resilience holds the potential to influence the leading causes of adolescent death, injuries, homicide and suicide with the frequent involvement of depression and substance abuse. The specific aims were to: 1) propose and test a theoretical model of psychosocial resilience; 2) identify the prevalence of psychosocial resilience; and 3) explore the gender differences in the model. The combined theoretical framework of Lazarus' Theory of Stress and Coping and Lerner's Model of Developmental Contextualism was used. This observational, secondary analysis used a cross sectional sample of 624 rural adolescents from schools in Western Pennsylvania. The instruments included Life Orientation-Revised, Life Event Checklist, Perceived Social Support Scale, Coping Response Inventory-Youth Form, Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale, and Drug Use Screening Inventory. Intervention To Promote Mental Health in Rural Youth (NIH Grant#RO1NR03616, K. Puskar Primary Investigator) was the parent study. Structural equation modeling was the primary method for analysis. The results indicated that 17% (n=104) of the adolescents demonstrated psychosocial resilience with twice as many males as females. Life orientation(pessimism, optimism) had the strongest relationship with psychosocial resilience in this model. Relationships among variables and implications will also be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Resilience in Rural Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159487-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychosocial Resilience in Rural Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tusaie-Mumford, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Advance Practice Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 206G, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.7561</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ktusaie@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">All over the world, adolescents are going to school, learning and making friends without developing depression or substance abuse. Many of these adolescents navigate the effects of poverty, violence, or seriously ill parents. We have much to learn from these resilient adolescents. Psychosocial resilience is the combination of characteristics that allows at-risk individuals to successfully cope and function above the norm. Understanding the interactive processes present in psychosocial resilience holds the potential to influence the leading causes of adolescent death, injuries, homicide and suicide with the frequent involvement of depression and substance abuse. The specific aims were to: 1) propose and test a theoretical model of psychosocial resilience; 2) identify the prevalence of psychosocial resilience; and 3) explore the gender differences in the model. The combined theoretical framework of Lazarus' Theory of Stress and Coping and Lerner's Model of Developmental Contextualism was used. This observational, secondary analysis used a cross sectional sample of 624 rural adolescents from schools in Western Pennsylvania. The instruments included Life Orientation-Revised, Life Event Checklist, Perceived Social Support Scale, Coping Response Inventory-Youth Form, Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale, and Drug Use Screening Inventory. Intervention To Promote Mental Health in Rural Youth (NIH Grant#RO1NR03616, K. Puskar Primary Investigator) was the parent study. Structural equation modeling was the primary method for analysis. The results indicated that 17% (n=104) of the adolescents demonstrated psychosocial resilience with twice as many males as females. Life orientation(pessimism, optimism) had the strongest relationship with psychosocial resilience in this model. Relationships among variables and implications will also be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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