Understanding How Having a Disability Influences Quality of Life: the Perspectives of Adults with Physical Disabilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159489
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding How Having a Disability Influences Quality of Life: the Perspectives of Adults with Physical Disabilities
Abstract:
Understanding How Having a Disability Influences Quality of Life: the Perspectives of Adults with Physical Disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lutz, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.2476
The goal of health and long-term care for people with physical disabilities (PWDs) is to minimize disability and maintain or enhance quality of life (QOL). However, few studies examine how PWDs perceive the impact of disability on QOL. This grounded theory study explored the impact on QOL of having a disability from the perspectives of PWDs. Using the process of constant comparative dimensional analysis, portions of text from 44 interviews with working-age physically disabled adults, and five published experiential narratives that described living with a disability were analyzed. For many PWDs, having a disability is perceived as a part of their life's experience that they try to integrate into the rest of their lives. Three factors related to having a disability influenced QOL for PWDs: 1) the impact of the physically disabling condition, itself; 2) the need for and use of multiple resources from a variety of sources; and 3) others' perceptions of disability and its impact on QOL. PWDs employed multiple strategies to manage and mediate the influence of having a disability. These strategies created work for PWDs; depleted already limited resources of time, energy, finances, and informal supports; and were disruptive to QOL. However, the strategies were necessary because often services were funded and provided based on others' perceptions of disability, were fragmented and narrowly focused, did not include the perspectives of PWDs, and therefore, did not sufficiently meet the needs of PWDs. The findings indicate the need for 1) collaborative integration of the perspectives of PWDs into the design of policies and services, and 2) community-wide, integrated policies and delivery systems for health and long-term care with flexible funding and coverage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding How Having a Disability Influences Quality of Life: the Perspectives of Adults with Physical Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159489-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding How Having a Disability Influences Quality of Life: the Perspectives of Adults with Physical Disabilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lutz, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post-Doctoral Research Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.2476</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bjlutz@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The goal of health and long-term care for people with physical disabilities (PWDs) is to minimize disability and maintain or enhance quality of life (QOL). However, few studies examine how PWDs perceive the impact of disability on QOL. This grounded theory study explored the impact on QOL of having a disability from the perspectives of PWDs. Using the process of constant comparative dimensional analysis, portions of text from 44 interviews with working-age physically disabled adults, and five published experiential narratives that described living with a disability were analyzed. For many PWDs, having a disability is perceived as a part of their life's experience that they try to integrate into the rest of their lives. Three factors related to having a disability influenced QOL for PWDs: 1) the impact of the physically disabling condition, itself; 2) the need for and use of multiple resources from a variety of sources; and 3) others' perceptions of disability and its impact on QOL. PWDs employed multiple strategies to manage and mediate the influence of having a disability. These strategies created work for PWDs; depleted already limited resources of time, energy, finances, and informal supports; and were disruptive to QOL. However, the strategies were necessary because often services were funded and provided based on others' perceptions of disability, were fragmented and narrowly focused, did not include the perspectives of PWDs, and therefore, did not sufficiently meet the needs of PWDs. The findings indicate the need for 1) collaborative integration of the perspectives of PWDs into the design of policies and services, and 2) community-wide, integrated policies and delivery systems for health and long-term care with flexible funding and coverage.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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