2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159491
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Women's Perceptions of Successful Aging
Abstract:
Older Women's Perceptions of Successful Aging
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Rossen, Eileen
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA
Contact Telephone:765.494.9248
The number of people over age 65 is expected to double by the year 2030. The resultant health care needs of this growing aging population is projected to be financially and resource costly to individuals, families, and society. Consequently, the study of "successful aging" has become a major theme of scientific discussion among gerontology scholars as well as in the public policy arena. The preponderance of the literature focuses on longitudinal objective data with a paucity of subjective data on the meaning of successful aging. In particular, older women who are the most rapidly growing segment of the U.S. population, experience aging -successful or not- in greater proportion than men. This qualitative study investigated the concept of successful aging as defined by older women. Data were collected as a part of a larger longitudinal qualitative study of 31 urban community dwelling elders using intensive face-to-face semi-structured audio taped interviews (Rossen, 1998). Miles and Huberman's (1994) methodology guided the data management and analytic procedures. Key themes and patterns that characterize successful aging were identified. Findings provide a strong foundation for the development of nursing programs to promote and reinforce personal, social and behavioral factors that influence successful aging. Intervention programs that promote successful aging should help to reduce costs to individuals, families an society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Women's Perceptions of Successful Agingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159491-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Women's Perceptions of Successful Aging</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rossen, Eileen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1337 Johnson Hall, West Lafayette, IN, 47907-1337, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.494.9248</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rossen@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The number of people over age 65 is expected to double by the year 2030. The resultant health care needs of this growing aging population is projected to be financially and resource costly to individuals, families, and society. Consequently, the study of &quot;successful aging&quot; has become a major theme of scientific discussion among gerontology scholars as well as in the public policy arena. The preponderance of the literature focuses on longitudinal objective data with a paucity of subjective data on the meaning of successful aging. In particular, older women who are the most rapidly growing segment of the U.S. population, experience aging -successful or not- in greater proportion than men. This qualitative study investigated the concept of successful aging as defined by older women. Data were collected as a part of a larger longitudinal qualitative study of 31 urban community dwelling elders using intensive face-to-face semi-structured audio taped interviews (Rossen, 1998). Miles and Huberman's (1994) methodology guided the data management and analytic procedures. Key themes and patterns that characterize successful aging were identified. Findings provide a strong foundation for the development of nursing programs to promote and reinforce personal, social and behavioral factors that influence successful aging. Intervention programs that promote successful aging should help to reduce costs to individuals, families an society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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