2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159492
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oldest-Old Rural Adults Describe Frailty
Abstract:
Oldest-Old Rural Adults Describe Frailty
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hinck, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:417.886.4929
The purpose of this study was to explore life experiences of oldest-old (85+ years) individuals who lived alone in rural Midwest communities and provide detailed description and interpretation of the meaning of their lived experiences. The sample consisted of 19 participants (13 women, 6 men, all White, mean age 91.4, range 85-98 years) who were interviewed at least three times in their homes (59 total interviews). Interviews were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed in an interpretive phenomenological tradition of paradigm cases, thematic analysis, and exemplars. Participants initially presented themselves as self-sufficient and capable. However, in repeated telling of how they managed day-to-day self-care and home chores, they revealed how exertion during common activities resulted in fatigue and over-fatigue. Participants elaborated on a precarious balance between completing everyday activities and becoming so tired that they felt weak and incapacitated for hours or days. Participants described their experiences of how much exertion would lead to immediate fatigue and the delayed response of being over-fatigued. Adaptive strategies to live with frailty included pacing themselves, use of adaptive aides, eliminating some activities, and restructuring how they thought about what activities were important to them. Understanding how oldest-old adults experience over-fatigue in relation to their frailty helps formal and informal care providers develop interventions to prevent over-fatigue and support older adults in performing necessary and desired activities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOldest-Old Rural Adults Describe Frailtyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159492-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Oldest-Old Rural Adults Describe Frailty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hinck, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">417.886.4929</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shspfd@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to explore life experiences of oldest-old (85+ years) individuals who lived alone in rural Midwest communities and provide detailed description and interpretation of the meaning of their lived experiences. The sample consisted of 19 participants (13 women, 6 men, all White, mean age 91.4, range 85-98 years) who were interviewed at least three times in their homes (59 total interviews). Interviews were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed in an interpretive phenomenological tradition of paradigm cases, thematic analysis, and exemplars. Participants initially presented themselves as self-sufficient and capable. However, in repeated telling of how they managed day-to-day self-care and home chores, they revealed how exertion during common activities resulted in fatigue and over-fatigue. Participants elaborated on a precarious balance between completing everyday activities and becoming so tired that they felt weak and incapacitated for hours or days. Participants described their experiences of how much exertion would lead to immediate fatigue and the delayed response of being over-fatigued. Adaptive strategies to live with frailty included pacing themselves, use of adaptive aides, eliminating some activities, and restructuring how they thought about what activities were important to them. Understanding how oldest-old adults experience over-fatigue in relation to their frailty helps formal and informal care providers develop interventions to prevent over-fatigue and support older adults in performing necessary and desired activities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:03:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:03:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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