Unreliable Narrators and Unreliable Readers: Trustworthiness and Bias in Narrative Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159494
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unreliable Narrators and Unreliable Readers: Trustworthiness and Bias in Narrative Research
Abstract:
Unreliable Narrators and Unreliable Readers: Trustworthiness and Bias in Narrative Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Ayres, Loiness
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5308
Narrative research methods conceptualize data as stories and use a variety of narrative theories as the basis of interpretation. This paper describes a relatively new approach to narrative analysis based on reader-response criticism. This innovative approach to qualitative research identifies concepts from literary criticism that apply equally to literary works and qualitative data. Narrative research based on reader-response explores not only the tale but the way in which the tale is told; meanings may be explicit in the tale as well as implicit in the telling. Although evidence for explicit meanings is usually apparent in coded data, the implicit meanings of the telling may be more ephemeral and therefore more subject to bias. The purpose of this paper is to present, through literary and data-based examples, the benefits and hazards of a reader-response based approach to qualitative research. We will present examples, both from literature and from a qualitative data set, of unreliable narrators, that is, narrators who are uninformed, misinformed, or who present misinformation about their own situation. We will demonstrate the use of reader-response theory in identifying the characteristics of unreliable narrators and some potential approaches to the interpretation of such accounts. We will also provide examples of ways in which qualitative researchers may become unreliable readers, and offer some recommendations for strategies to avoid biased or misinformed interpretations by researchers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnreliable Narrators and Unreliable Readers: Trustworthiness and Bias in Narrative Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159494-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Unreliable Narrators and Unreliable Readers: Trustworthiness and Bias in Narrative Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ayres, Loiness</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5308</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">layres@facstaff.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Narrative research methods conceptualize data as stories and use a variety of narrative theories as the basis of interpretation. This paper describes a relatively new approach to narrative analysis based on reader-response criticism. This innovative approach to qualitative research identifies concepts from literary criticism that apply equally to literary works and qualitative data. Narrative research based on reader-response explores not only the tale but the way in which the tale is told; meanings may be explicit in the tale as well as implicit in the telling. Although evidence for explicit meanings is usually apparent in coded data, the implicit meanings of the telling may be more ephemeral and therefore more subject to bias. The purpose of this paper is to present, through literary and data-based examples, the benefits and hazards of a reader-response based approach to qualitative research. We will present examples, both from literature and from a qualitative data set, of unreliable narrators, that is, narrators who are uninformed, misinformed, or who present misinformation about their own situation. We will demonstrate the use of reader-response theory in identifying the characteristics of unreliable narrators and some potential approaches to the interpretation of such accounts. We will also provide examples of ways in which qualitative researchers may become unreliable readers, and offer some recommendations for strategies to avoid biased or misinformed interpretations by researchers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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