2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159495
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnancy Among Poor Urban and Rural Women
Abstract:
Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnancy Among Poor Urban and Rural Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Flick, Louise
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314.577.8992
Twenty to thirty percent of women of all ages are estimated to have experienced a psychiatric disorder in the last 12 months and women of childbearing age (15-44) have even higher rates than older women (Robins & Regier, 1991; Kessler, et al., 1994). However, prior to this study there were no population-based prevalence data for a range of psychiatric illnesses in pregnancy. Yet, single diagnosis studies indicate serious consequences for the infant. Depression triples the rate of low birth weight births and schizophrenia is associated with twice the infant mortality of non-ill mothers. As part of a larger prospective cohort study with a stress and coping conceptual framework, we have evaluated 528 pregnant women stratified by race and urban/rural residence who were recruited through WIC nutrition sites. A standardized psychiatric interview (DIS-IV) determined lifetime and current diagnoses for 19 disorders. Results indicate 54.2% have at least one lifetime psychiatric disorder and 26.9% a current disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and nicotine dependence are the most prevalent diagnoses in pregnancy (9.8 and 7.6% respectively). However, only 4% have nicotine dependence without meeting criteria for another disorder. Substance use disorders (including nicotine) affect 9.8% of the sample (3% drug abuse or dependence and 1% alcohol). A total of 12.3% report a current affective disorder. Anxiety disorders were found in 6.1%. Psychosis was infrequent with only 2 cases (0.4%). Few women with an active disorder in pregnancy report ever receiving mental health treatment (25%), while 19% wanted it but did not receive it and 54% did not want or seek treatment. These data will be compared to figures for women of similar ages from other populations and the implications for nurses caring for women in pregnancy discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnancy Among Poor Urban and Rural Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159495-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnancy Among Poor Urban and Rural Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flick, Louise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.577.8992</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">flicklh@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Twenty to thirty percent of women of all ages are estimated to have experienced a psychiatric disorder in the last 12 months and women of childbearing age (15-44) have even higher rates than older women (Robins &amp; Regier, 1991; Kessler, et al., 1994). However, prior to this study there were no population-based prevalence data for a range of psychiatric illnesses in pregnancy. Yet, single diagnosis studies indicate serious consequences for the infant. Depression triples the rate of low birth weight births and schizophrenia is associated with twice the infant mortality of non-ill mothers. As part of a larger prospective cohort study with a stress and coping conceptual framework, we have evaluated 528 pregnant women stratified by race and urban/rural residence who were recruited through WIC nutrition sites. A standardized psychiatric interview (DIS-IV) determined lifetime and current diagnoses for 19 disorders. Results indicate 54.2% have at least one lifetime psychiatric disorder and 26.9% a current disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and nicotine dependence are the most prevalent diagnoses in pregnancy (9.8 and 7.6% respectively). However, only 4% have nicotine dependence without meeting criteria for another disorder. Substance use disorders (including nicotine) affect 9.8% of the sample (3% drug abuse or dependence and 1% alcohol). A total of 12.3% report a current affective disorder. Anxiety disorders were found in 6.1%. Psychosis was infrequent with only 2 cases (0.4%). Few women with an active disorder in pregnancy report ever receiving mental health treatment (25%), while 19% wanted it but did not receive it and 54% did not want or seek treatment. These data will be compared to figures for women of similar ages from other populations and the implications for nurses caring for women in pregnancy discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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