2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159496
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Experiences of Runaway and Homeless Girls
Abstract:
Health Experiences of Runaway and Homeless Girls
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Taylor-Seehafer, Margaret
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Austin
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, D0100, Austin, TX, 78701-1412, USA
Contact Telephone:512.471.8323
Purpose: Homelessness is a significant social problem with detrimental risks for all adolescents. Yet current research has largely ignored its impact on the health of runaway girls. This interpretive study explored the health experiences of runaway and homeless girls from their point of view within the contexts of gender and culture. Conceptual Framework: Meanings of health were revealed through the participants' language and discourse and through participants' narrative epiphany events, or turning point life experiences. Methods: Ten homeless females 14 to 20 years of age self-identified as runaways were recruited from street outreach and youth shelter programs. Data sources were semi-structured group and individual interviews, fieldnotes, and participant observations. Results: Subthemes were linked to form the cumulative epiphany, Health on the street as process of adventure, risk, and trial. Four minor themes emerged: a) Health is unimportant: Until you're feeling ill; b) The alcohol and other drug (AOD) filter: It's just the dope; c) Health as gendered process: The meaning of Blue, and d) Crossing cultural borders: How we negotiate street life. Conclusions: Negotiating cultural borders is a metaphor for exiting the street. Health was viewed as the absence of symptoms or illness. Runaway girls who used AOD discounted physical symptoms of illness, attributing their bodily symptoms to the drugs they used. Youth under the influence of AOD did not seek health care, as they believed they would be treated differently than if they had a naturally caused illness. However, runaway girls who were exiting the street demonstrated agency and resourcefulness in seeking health care. Gendered economic street activities placed runaway girls at risk for victimization on the street. In this sense, runaway girls did not experience equality of movement in crossing cultural borders to exit the street.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Experiences of Runaway and Homeless Girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159496-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Experiences of Runaway and Homeless Girls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor-Seehafer, Margaret</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, D0100, Austin, TX, 78701-1412, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">512.471.8323</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mtaylor@mail.nur.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Homelessness is a significant social problem with detrimental risks for all adolescents. Yet current research has largely ignored its impact on the health of runaway girls. This interpretive study explored the health experiences of runaway and homeless girls from their point of view within the contexts of gender and culture. Conceptual Framework: Meanings of health were revealed through the participants' language and discourse and through participants' narrative epiphany events, or turning point life experiences. Methods: Ten homeless females 14 to 20 years of age self-identified as runaways were recruited from street outreach and youth shelter programs. Data sources were semi-structured group and individual interviews, fieldnotes, and participant observations. Results: Subthemes were linked to form the cumulative epiphany, Health on the street as process of adventure, risk, and trial. Four minor themes emerged: a) Health is unimportant: Until you're feeling ill; b) The alcohol and other drug (AOD) filter: It's just the dope; c) Health as gendered process: The meaning of Blue, and d) Crossing cultural borders: How we negotiate street life. Conclusions: Negotiating cultural borders is a metaphor for exiting the street. Health was viewed as the absence of symptoms or illness. Runaway girls who used AOD discounted physical symptoms of illness, attributing their bodily symptoms to the drugs they used. Youth under the influence of AOD did not seek health care, as they believed they would be treated differently than if they had a naturally caused illness. However, runaway girls who were exiting the street demonstrated agency and resourcefulness in seeking health care. Gendered economic street activities placed runaway girls at risk for victimization on the street. In this sense, runaway girls did not experience equality of movement in crossing cultural borders to exit the street.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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