2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159497
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Glycemic Control in a Low Income Diabetic Population
Abstract:
Predictors of Glycemic Control in a Low Income Diabetic Population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Kreulen, Grace, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA
Contact Telephone:517.353.8679
The purpose of this study is to describe characteristics of low-income persons receiving primary care for diabetes that place them at risk for poor glycemic control. Diabetes is a high demand disease for which intensive glycemic control has been established as essential to the prevention of secondary complications. Iezzoni's (1997) effectiveness model informed the identification of clinical and nonclinical dimensions of risk with relevance to diabetes management. Multidimensional factors present at the time of initial treatment were studied to index risk. Data were collected by a one-year audit of a sample of charts (N=446) representing an ethnically diverse, low-income population. Access to care, utilization, risk behavior, self-care behavior, demographic, social support, and clinical indicator data were collected. Data were analyzed using group comparisons and predictive modeling. Results indicate that persons with very poor glycemic control (HbA1c >9.5) were significantly more likely to be non-English speaking, employed and uninsured, and to lack social support, perform fewer self management tasks, have more difficult disease adjustment and make fewer clinic and phone visits. Predictors of higher HbA1c levels included insulin therapy, difficult disease adjustment, non-English speaking, employment, and no exercise self-care plan (R2=.18). Knowledge of factors related to and predictive of glycemic control can be applied to tailoring care protocols to address the specific clinical care needs of low-income populations with diabetes and to empower better self-management in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Glycemic Control in a Low Income Diabetic Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159497-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Glycemic Control in a Low Income Diabetic Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kreulen, Grace, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517.353.8679</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gkreulen@msu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study is to describe characteristics of low-income persons receiving primary care for diabetes that place them at risk for poor glycemic control. Diabetes is a high demand disease for which intensive glycemic control has been established as essential to the prevention of secondary complications. Iezzoni's (1997) effectiveness model informed the identification of clinical and nonclinical dimensions of risk with relevance to diabetes management. Multidimensional factors present at the time of initial treatment were studied to index risk. Data were collected by a one-year audit of a sample of charts (N=446) representing an ethnically diverse, low-income population. Access to care, utilization, risk behavior, self-care behavior, demographic, social support, and clinical indicator data were collected. Data were analyzed using group comparisons and predictive modeling. Results indicate that persons with very poor glycemic control (HbA1c &gt;9.5) were significantly more likely to be non-English speaking, employed and uninsured, and to lack social support, perform fewer self management tasks, have more difficult disease adjustment and make fewer clinic and phone visits. Predictors of higher HbA1c levels included insulin therapy, difficult disease adjustment, non-English speaking, employment, and no exercise self-care plan (R2=.18). Knowledge of factors related to and predictive of glycemic control can be applied to tailoring care protocols to address the specific clinical care needs of low-income populations with diabetes and to empower better self-management in this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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