2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159502
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cytokine Levels in Sleep and Allergy
Abstract:
Cytokine Levels in Sleep and Allergy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Krouse, Helene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Dean
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 380 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.9006
Over 20% of Americans suffer from symptoms associated with allergic disease. These individuals often experience daytime somnolence, fatigue, and malaise that affect their daily functioning. It was hypothesized that there might be a relationship between specific immune mediators associated with allergy and alterations in sleep pattern in allergic patients. This pilot study used a descriptive, correlational design to examine the relationship between serum cytokines, sleep architecture and sleep continuity patterns, and allergic symptoms in both allergic and non-allergic subjects to further delineate the physiological mechanisms that contribute to the sequella of allergic disease. A sample of eight subjects, four allergic and four non-allergic, underwent two nights of polysomnographic recordings. Night One was an adaptation night and on Night Two serum cytokine levels were drawn prior to sleep, during NONREM and REM sleep, upon final awakening, and one hour after final awakening. Subjects also completed measures to assess allergic symptoms and quality of life associated with allergic disease. Findings revealed that three cytokines°XIL-1ƒÒ, IL-4, and IL-10, termed pro-allergic cytokines, were higher in allergic subjects, and three cytokines°XIL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12, termed allergy-inhibitory cytokines, were higher in nonallergic subjects. In relationship to the sleep parameters, the three allergy-inhibitory cytokines strongly correlated with REM latency sleep and negatively correlated with time spent in REM sleep. Nonallergic subjects had a slightly greater sleep latency and spent more time in stage 1 sleep than allergic subjects. Allergic subjects required twice as much time to enter REM sleep and spent less time in REM sleep than the nonallergic subjects. Significant negative correlations were found between levels of IL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12 and allergy symptoms. This suggests that allergic symptoms and quality of life impairment are associated with decreased levels of these allergy-inhibitory cytokines and are not associated with elevated levels of the pro-allergic cytokines.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCytokine Levels in Sleep and Allergyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159502-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cytokine Levels in Sleep and Allergy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Krouse, Helene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 380 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.9006</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hjkrouse@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over 20% of Americans suffer from symptoms associated with allergic disease. These individuals often experience daytime somnolence, fatigue, and malaise that affect their daily functioning. It was hypothesized that there might be a relationship between specific immune mediators associated with allergy and alterations in sleep pattern in allergic patients. This pilot study used a descriptive, correlational design to examine the relationship between serum cytokines, sleep architecture and sleep continuity patterns, and allergic symptoms in both allergic and non-allergic subjects to further delineate the physiological mechanisms that contribute to the sequella of allergic disease. A sample of eight subjects, four allergic and four non-allergic, underwent two nights of polysomnographic recordings. Night One was an adaptation night and on Night Two serum cytokine levels were drawn prior to sleep, during NONREM and REM sleep, upon final awakening, and one hour after final awakening. Subjects also completed measures to assess allergic symptoms and quality of life associated with allergic disease. Findings revealed that three cytokines&deg;XIL-1&fnof;&Ograve;, IL-4, and IL-10, termed pro-allergic cytokines, were higher in allergic subjects, and three cytokines&deg;XIL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12, termed allergy-inhibitory cytokines, were higher in nonallergic subjects. In relationship to the sleep parameters, the three allergy-inhibitory cytokines strongly correlated with REM latency sleep and negatively correlated with time spent in REM sleep. Nonallergic subjects had a slightly greater sleep latency and spent more time in stage 1 sleep than allergic subjects. Allergic subjects required twice as much time to enter REM sleep and spent less time in REM sleep than the nonallergic subjects. Significant negative correlations were found between levels of IL-1ra, IL-2, and IL-12 and allergy symptoms. This suggests that allergic symptoms and quality of life impairment are associated with decreased levels of these allergy-inhibitory cytokines and are not associated with elevated levels of the pro-allergic cytokines.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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