2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159503
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and Coping in Older Women with Osteoarthritis
Abstract:
Stress and Coping in Older Women with Osteoarthritis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Romer, Charlene
P.I. Institution Name:Quincy University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing, PO Box 7005, 11th & Oak, Quincy, IL, 62305-7005, USA
Purpose: The purpose of the study was to identify and describe the stressors, appraisals, emotional reactions, and actual coping efforts of older women with osteoarthritis. Theoretical framework: This investigation was based on the stress-coping model developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1984). Sample: Ten women over the age of 50 from a small community in Midwestern United States. Method: An exploratory, descriptive design was used. Each woman completed a demographic questionnaire and the Disability Index of the Health Assessment Questionnaire before participating in semi-structured interviews. Results: Content analysis was performed on informants' responses to questions related to stress and coping in the context of living with osteoarthritis. Findings revealed that the stressors associated with osteoarthritis involved physical, psychological, as well as social aspects of their lives. Pain, disability and dependence on others were identified as major stressors. The majority of the respondents appraised the personal significance of having osteoarthritis as stressful both in terms of actual loss and potential loss in the future. Conclusion: Living with osteoarthritis evoked stressful emotions such as anger, frustration, discouragement, fear and helplessness. A variety of problem-focused and emotion-focused (palliative) coping efforts were used to manage the stressors associated with this disease. Findings from this study provide clues for meaningful nursing intervention with the individuals who live with osteoarthritis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and Coping in Older Women with Osteoarthritisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159503-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and Coping in Older Women with Osteoarthritis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Romer, Charlene</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Quincy University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing, PO Box 7005, 11th &amp; Oak, Quincy, IL, 62305-7005, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of the study was to identify and describe the stressors, appraisals, emotional reactions, and actual coping efforts of older women with osteoarthritis. Theoretical framework: This investigation was based on the stress-coping model developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1984). Sample: Ten women over the age of 50 from a small community in Midwestern United States. Method: An exploratory, descriptive design was used. Each woman completed a demographic questionnaire and the Disability Index of the Health Assessment Questionnaire before participating in semi-structured interviews. Results: Content analysis was performed on informants' responses to questions related to stress and coping in the context of living with osteoarthritis. Findings revealed that the stressors associated with osteoarthritis involved physical, psychological, as well as social aspects of their lives. Pain, disability and dependence on others were identified as major stressors. The majority of the respondents appraised the personal significance of having osteoarthritis as stressful both in terms of actual loss and potential loss in the future. Conclusion: Living with osteoarthritis evoked stressful emotions such as anger, frustration, discouragement, fear and helplessness. A variety of problem-focused and emotion-focused (palliative) coping efforts were used to manage the stressors associated with this disease. Findings from this study provide clues for meaningful nursing intervention with the individuals who live with osteoarthritis.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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