Effect of a Structured Walking Program on Adoption and Short-Term Maintenance of Leisure-Time Walking Behavior in Midlife Healthy Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159505
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of a Structured Walking Program on Adoption and Short-Term Maintenance of Leisure-Time Walking Behavior in Midlife Healthy Women
Abstract:
Effect of a Structured Walking Program on Adoption and Short-Term Maintenance of Leisure-Time Walking Behavior in Midlife Healthy Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Aurilio, Louise , PhD, RNC, Cna
P.I. Institution Name:Youngstown State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:943 Dravis Ave., Girard, Ohio, 44420, United States
Contact Telephone:330-539-4020
This study used a self-efficacy theory based intervention that tested the effect of a leisure-time walking program that incorporated women's physical activity health promotion education and supervised walking physical activity to increase walking adoption and short-term adherence behavior in healthy midlife women between the ages of 30-50. This study used a randomized controlled, three-group experimental design. Interventions were: (1) survey questionnaire and mailed health education brochures for 4-weeks (group 1); (2) a one-hour lecture/physical activity education program followed with mailed brochures for 4-weeks (group 2); and (3) a one-hour lecture/physical activity education program followed with mailed brochures for 4-weeks, as well as, a three time per week 30-minute supervised walking exercise program for a 4-week period (group 3). The sample consisted of (74) healthy midlife women, who were members of community based women's organizations. Instruments used in this study included the following: (1) a Physical Activity History Recruitment Screen; (2) a Leisure-Time Walking Physical Activity Diary; (3) the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, Section 4: Exercise; (4) a Chronic Disorder Risk Perception Scale; (5) the Center for Research in Chronic Disorders(CRCD) Sociodemographic Profile; and (6) the Lifestyle Pattern Profile. Assessments occurred pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention (4-weeks), and again 8-weeks following the intervention. There were no baseline significant differences between chronic disorder perceptions. Results indicated that there was a significant difference between treatment interventions and adoption of leisure-time walking between groups. There were no statistically significant (between group treatment intervention differences) found for leisure-time walking maintenance. Walking intervention programs that include physical activity health promotion lectures, brochures, and a structured supervised walking component are more likely to result in walking adoption than leisure-time walking short-term maintenance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of a Structured Walking Program on Adoption and Short-Term Maintenance of Leisure-Time Walking Behavior in Midlife Healthy Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159505-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of a Structured Walking Program on Adoption and Short-Term Maintenance of Leisure-Time Walking Behavior in Midlife Healthy Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aurilio, Louise , PhD, RNC, Cna</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Youngstown State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">943 Dravis Ave., Girard, Ohio, 44420, United States</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-539-4020</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">laurilio@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study used a self-efficacy theory based intervention that tested the effect of a leisure-time walking program that incorporated women's physical activity health promotion education and supervised walking physical activity to increase walking adoption and short-term adherence behavior in healthy midlife women between the ages of 30-50. This study used a randomized controlled, three-group experimental design. Interventions were: (1) survey questionnaire and mailed health education brochures for 4-weeks (group 1); (2) a one-hour lecture/physical activity education program followed with mailed brochures for 4-weeks (group 2); and (3) a one-hour lecture/physical activity education program followed with mailed brochures for 4-weeks, as well as, a three time per week 30-minute supervised walking exercise program for a 4-week period (group 3). The sample consisted of (74) healthy midlife women, who were members of community based women's organizations. Instruments used in this study included the following: (1) a Physical Activity History Recruitment Screen; (2) a Leisure-Time Walking Physical Activity Diary; (3) the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, Section 4: Exercise; (4) a Chronic Disorder Risk Perception Scale; (5) the Center for Research in Chronic Disorders(CRCD) Sociodemographic Profile; and (6) the Lifestyle Pattern Profile. Assessments occurred pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention (4-weeks), and again 8-weeks following the intervention. There were no baseline significant differences between chronic disorder perceptions. Results indicated that there was a significant difference between treatment interventions and adoption of leisure-time walking between groups. There were no statistically significant (between group treatment intervention differences) found for leisure-time walking maintenance. Walking intervention programs that include physical activity health promotion lectures, brochures, and a structured supervised walking component are more likely to result in walking adoption than leisure-time walking short-term maintenance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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