A Test of the Effect of Guided Participation on Mother and Premature Infant Feeding Affect and Behavior

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159506
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Test of the Effect of Guided Participation on Mother and Premature Infant Feeding Affect and Behavior
Abstract:
A Test of the Effect of Guided Participation on Mother and Premature Infant Feeding Affect and Behavior
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Professor Emeritus
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.9886
The study purpose was to examine the effect on family caregiving of guided participation (GP), a way of aiding families in developing competence in feeding very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants in the first year, post-term age (PTA). GP originates in education-anthropological theory and research about learning socially important practices (e.g., infant feeding) through guided experience. Study questions concerned what GP contributed to the adaptiveness of mother and infant feeding affect and behavior, assessed in terms of expression of positive affect and sensitive and responsive behavior and regulation of negative affect and feeding behavior. Covariates of adaptive affect and behavior included family resources, estimated with income above or below federal poverty level; the infant's age and condition, the latter estimated with birth weight; the regulation of negative affect and behavior for the other member of the dyad (mother or infant); and intervention intensity, estimated with nurse-family time together. In a longitudinal clinical trial, families were randomized to either the GP or Standard Care (SC) groups. The feedings of 38 mothers at least 17 years old and their VLBW infants (birth weight < 1500 g) were video-taped in their homes at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months PTA and scored from videotapes with the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment rating scale. The General Linear Mixed Model was used to estimate the fixed effects of the theoretical model. GP had a significant positive effect on mother's regulation of negative affect and behavior (p=.002), primarily in the infant's first 4 months. The infant's birth weight and age as well as nurse-family time had a significant negative effect on this regulation, while infant regulation had a positive effect. These results support strengthened GP as the infant grows older, attention to mother's aid of infant affective and behavioral regulation, and family services to help focus nurse-family time on caregiving competency development.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Test of the Effect of Guided Participation on Mother and Premature Infant Feeding Affect and Behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159506-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Test of the Effect of Guided Participation on Mother and Premature Infant Feeding Affect and Behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor Emeritus</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.9886</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The study purpose was to examine the effect on family caregiving of guided participation (GP), a way of aiding families in developing competence in feeding very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants in the first year, post-term age (PTA). GP originates in education-anthropological theory and research about learning socially important practices (e.g., infant feeding) through guided experience. Study questions concerned what GP contributed to the adaptiveness of mother and infant feeding affect and behavior, assessed in terms of expression of positive affect and sensitive and responsive behavior and regulation of negative affect and feeding behavior. Covariates of adaptive affect and behavior included family resources, estimated with income above or below federal poverty level; the infant's age and condition, the latter estimated with birth weight; the regulation of negative affect and behavior for the other member of the dyad (mother or infant); and intervention intensity, estimated with nurse-family time together. In a longitudinal clinical trial, families were randomized to either the GP or Standard Care (SC) groups. The feedings of 38 mothers at least 17 years old and their VLBW infants (birth weight &lt; 1500 g) were video-taped in their homes at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months PTA and scored from videotapes with the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment rating scale. The General Linear Mixed Model was used to estimate the fixed effects of the theoretical model. GP had a significant positive effect on mother's regulation of negative affect and behavior (p=.002), primarily in the infant's first 4 months. The infant's birth weight and age as well as nurse-family time had a significant negative effect on this regulation, while infant regulation had a positive effect. These results support strengthened GP as the infant grows older, attention to mother's aid of infant affective and behavioral regulation, and family services to help focus nurse-family time on caregiving competency development.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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