Early Kangaroo (Skin-to-Skin) Care Improves Preterm Infant Weight at 6 and 12 Months

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159507
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Early Kangaroo (Skin-to-Skin) Care Improves Preterm Infant Weight at 6 and 12 Months
Abstract:
Early Kangaroo (Skin-to-Skin) Care Improves Preterm Infant Weight at 6 and 12 Months
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Anderson, Gene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.3343
Preterm infant weight gain continues to be of interest for health-related reasons. Although studies of kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care support its safety and efficacy for infants and their mothers, infant weight gain during the first year postbirth has not been reported. One objective of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of early kangaroo care (EKC) on weight gain from birth to 18 months. Subjects were 100 preterm infants (32-36 completed weeks gestation) and their mothers. Randomization was done by computerized minimization using 13 prognostic factors, resulting in balanced groups. EKC mothers held their diaper-clad infants chest-to-chest and skin-to-skin between their breasts beginning as soon as possible postbirth (~ 10 hours) and occurring as often and for as long as possible each time for the first five days. Control infants were wrapped in 1-2 blankets and held at parent's request (standard care). The Anderson Mutual Caregiving model (1977) was the conceptual framework. Data reported here are for all infants returning for follow-up at 6 months (n=71) and 12 months (n=69) corrected age. Descriptive statistics and one-tailed t-tests were used for data analysis. Weights (Kg) for EKC infants versus controls at birth and 6 and 12 months, respectively, were 2.3, 8.8, and 10.3 versus 2.3, 7.8 and 9.9. Weight for EKC infants was significantly higher at 6 months (p=.005), but not at 12 months (p=.065). By MNRS 2002, 18-month follow-up will be complete and our report will include these weights as well. The encouraging weight trajectory in these KC infants compares favorably with the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics Standards and provides additional support for the safety and efficacy of EKC practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarly Kangaroo (Skin-to-Skin) Care Improves Preterm Infant Weight at 6 and 12 Monthsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159507-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Early Kangaroo (Skin-to-Skin) Care Improves Preterm Infant Weight at 6 and 12 Months</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Gene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.3343</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gca@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Preterm infant weight gain continues to be of interest for health-related reasons. Although studies of kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care support its safety and efficacy for infants and their mothers, infant weight gain during the first year postbirth has not been reported. One objective of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of early kangaroo care (EKC) on weight gain from birth to 18 months. Subjects were 100 preterm infants (32-36 completed weeks gestation) and their mothers. Randomization was done by computerized minimization using 13 prognostic factors, resulting in balanced groups. EKC mothers held their diaper-clad infants chest-to-chest and skin-to-skin between their breasts beginning as soon as possible postbirth (~ 10 hours) and occurring as often and for as long as possible each time for the first five days. Control infants were wrapped in 1-2 blankets and held at parent's request (standard care). The Anderson Mutual Caregiving model (1977) was the conceptual framework. Data reported here are for all infants returning for follow-up at 6 months (n=71) and 12 months (n=69) corrected age. Descriptive statistics and one-tailed t-tests were used for data analysis. Weights (Kg) for EKC infants versus controls at birth and 6 and 12 months, respectively, were 2.3, 8.8, and 10.3 versus 2.3, 7.8 and 9.9. Weight for EKC infants was significantly higher at 6 months (p=.005), but not at 12 months (p=.065). By MNRS 2002, 18-month follow-up will be complete and our report will include these weights as well. The encouraging weight trajectory in these KC infants compares favorably with the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics Standards and provides additional support for the safety and efficacy of EKC practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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