Nurses Report Practice Changes as a Result of Participation in a Study of Preterm Infant Feeding

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159509
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Report Practice Changes as a Result of Participation in a Study of Preterm Infant Feeding
Abstract:
Nurses Report Practice Changes as a Result of Participation in a Study of Preterm Infant Feeding
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:McCain, Gail, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Title:Assistant Vice President
Contact Address:3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA
Contact Telephone:513.636.4200
The purpose of this follow-up study was to identify practice changes that may have been adopted by RNs as a result of participation in a feeding study for preterm infants. Types of knowledge for nursing practice provided the framework for this project, with participation in a clinical study thought to provide exposure to new empirical and experiential knowledge. The sample included 8 registered nurses who had carried out the research feeding protocols with infants assigned to their care in a neonatal intensive care nursery. On completion of the feeding study and before the nurses were debriefed on the study results, they participated in a focus group. They were asked if their own practice, or practices in their nursery, had been affected because of empirical knowledge or experience gained from participating in the feeding study. The focus group proceedings were audio-taped, and then transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were content analyzed, and responses were grouped into like responses. The major effect on individual practice was that the nurses continued to use evidence based interventions that they had learned in order to carry out the research protocols. These interventions included offering nonnutritive sucking to bring infants to awake states before feeding, and behavioral state assessment to evaluate infant readiness for feeding. The major effect on nursery practice during the study was that the experimental infants were fed based on behavioral cues as assessed by nurses, rather than on timed schedules. After completion of the study, nursery practice reverted to feeding infants on schedules per physician orders. Subsequent to this focus group, an evidence based guideline for feeding healthy preterm infants has been developed and may be used in order to optimize nursing care and infant outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Report Practice Changes as a Result of Participation in a Study of Preterm Infant Feedingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159509-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses Report Practice Changes as a Result of Participation in a Study of Preterm Infant Feeding</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCain, Gail, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Vice President</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.636.4200</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mccag0@chmcc.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this follow-up study was to identify practice changes that may have been adopted by RNs as a result of participation in a feeding study for preterm infants. Types of knowledge for nursing practice provided the framework for this project, with participation in a clinical study thought to provide exposure to new empirical and experiential knowledge. The sample included 8 registered nurses who had carried out the research feeding protocols with infants assigned to their care in a neonatal intensive care nursery. On completion of the feeding study and before the nurses were debriefed on the study results, they participated in a focus group. They were asked if their own practice, or practices in their nursery, had been affected because of empirical knowledge or experience gained from participating in the feeding study. The focus group proceedings were audio-taped, and then transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were content analyzed, and responses were grouped into like responses. The major effect on individual practice was that the nurses continued to use evidence based interventions that they had learned in order to carry out the research protocols. These interventions included offering nonnutritive sucking to bring infants to awake states before feeding, and behavioral state assessment to evaluate infant readiness for feeding. The major effect on nursery practice during the study was that the experimental infants were fed based on behavioral cues as assessed by nurses, rather than on timed schedules. After completion of the study, nursery practice reverted to feeding infants on schedules per physician orders. Subsequent to this focus group, an evidence based guideline for feeding healthy preterm infants has been developed and may be used in order to optimize nursing care and infant outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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