2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159511
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Resourcefulness in African American Women
Abstract:
Predictors of Resourcefulness in African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.3612
Cultural prescription and social disapproval make caregiving an almost unavoidable, everyday occurrence for African American women. Although caregiving has been associated with stress, strain, burden, and emotional exhaustion, specific skills for coping with caregiving, such as those constituting resourcefulness, have not been extensively examined in this population. According to Rosenbaum's theoretical model, learned resourcefulness is influenced directly by psychological factors and indirectly by situational and physiological factors. This study examined a predictive model of learned resourcefulness from specific situational (socioeconomic status, frequency and quality of social support, and daily hassles), physiological (age, body mass index, number of reported health problems, and 24-hour mean systolic blood pressure), and psychological factors (positive cognitions) within the context of caregiving and of particular relevance to African American women. The model was tested by analyzing data obtained from the second wave of data collection from a probability sample of 102 caregivers and 122 noncaregivers that participated in a larger study of ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM). The ABPM data were obtained over a 24-hour period while data for situational, physiological, and psychological indicators and learned resourcefulness were obtained during private interviews. Contrary to Rosenbaum's model, stepwise multiple regression showed none of the physiological indicators influenced resourcefulness either directly or indirectly. Of the situational indicators, socioeconomic status and social support frequency and quality also played no consequential role. However, greater discomfort from daily hassles did predict significantly lower resourcefulness in both noncaregivers (?=-.24, p < .01) and caregivers (?=-.18, p=.07). In the caregivers only, the possibility of a partial mediating effect of positive cognitions was suggested (?=.18, p=.07). The findings suggest the need to examine further the effects of specific daily hassles on caregiving and the need to consider alternative models for predicting resourcefulness in African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Resourcefulness in African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159511-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Resourcefulness in African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.3612</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaz@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cultural prescription and social disapproval make caregiving an almost unavoidable, everyday occurrence for African American women. Although caregiving has been associated with stress, strain, burden, and emotional exhaustion, specific skills for coping with caregiving, such as those constituting resourcefulness, have not been extensively examined in this population. According to Rosenbaum's theoretical model, learned resourcefulness is influenced directly by psychological factors and indirectly by situational and physiological factors. This study examined a predictive model of learned resourcefulness from specific situational (socioeconomic status, frequency and quality of social support, and daily hassles), physiological (age, body mass index, number of reported health problems, and 24-hour mean systolic blood pressure), and psychological factors (positive cognitions) within the context of caregiving and of particular relevance to African American women. The model was tested by analyzing data obtained from the second wave of data collection from a probability sample of 102 caregivers and 122 noncaregivers that participated in a larger study of ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM). The ABPM data were obtained over a 24-hour period while data for situational, physiological, and psychological indicators and learned resourcefulness were obtained during private interviews. Contrary to Rosenbaum's model, stepwise multiple regression showed none of the physiological indicators influenced resourcefulness either directly or indirectly. Of the situational indicators, socioeconomic status and social support frequency and quality also played no consequential role. However, greater discomfort from daily hassles did predict significantly lower resourcefulness in both noncaregivers (?=-.24, p &lt; .01) and caregivers (?=-.18, p=.07). In the caregivers only, the possibility of a partial mediating effect of positive cognitions was suggested (?=.18, p=.07). The findings suggest the need to examine further the effects of specific daily hassles on caregiving and the need to consider alternative models for predicting resourcefulness in African American women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:04:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:04:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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